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47 results found for Controlling and Preventing Disease
Entomology Assistant Professor Kevin Vogel, doctoral student Carissa Gilliland, undergraduate student Ashley Dombrowski and doctoral student Nia Keyes-Scott look at a kissing bug in the lab. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Chagas Disease
A kiss has such romantic appeal, yet some kisses just end in heartbreak. A smooch from the Rhodnius prolixus, or the blood-sucking “kissing bug,” could be characterized more like the kiss of death — the insect is a primary vector for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that kills more than 10,000 people annually around the globe. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, victims with chronic cases of Chagas can suffer from life-threatening heart or digestive malfunctions.
Jayden Mulamoottil, a fourth-grade student at Barrow Elementary in Athens-Clarke County, placed first in Georgia's radon poster contest with an illustration imploring Georgians to check their homes for radon gas. CAES News
Radon Action Month
January is National Radon Action month, and each year University of Georgia Cooperative Extension sponsors a poster contest for students across the state to help bring awareness to the importance of radon testing.
kassem lab large (1) CAES News
Antimicrobial Resistance
A gene that causes bacteria to be resistant to one of the world’s most important antibiotics, colistin, has been detected in sewer water in Georgia. The presence of the MCR-9 gene is a major concern for public health because it causes antimicrobial resistance, a problem that the World Health Organization has declared “one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity.”
UGA Extension offers programs and guidance for people of all ages to improve their nutrition and live their best lives. CAES News
New Year's Resolutions
As the new year approaches, many people discover a renewed enthusiasm for self-care and self-improvement. Georgia residents looking for guidance on matters of health, healthy relationships, financial literacy and more can count on University of Georgia Cooperative Extension for a wealth of resources to help reach those goals.
(Illustration by Daniel Rouhani/ExonScientific) CAES News
Zoonotic Spillover
In the latter months of 2019, a novel coronavirus probably leaped from a yet-unknown animal in central China into a human. Some speculate that SARS-CoV-2 leaked from a laboratory in Wuhan, China. But evidence suggests that it’s far more likely that the virus was a natural “zoonotic” leap from animal to human. The resulting COVID-19 pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands of Americans, including more than 23,000 Georgians, and mutated into dangerous new variants.
Healthier Together hosted a community-wide planting day at Richland Community Garden in Richland, Georgia, southeast of Columbus. CAES News
Healthier Together
Obesity affects millions of Americans and increases the risk of stroke, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other causes of premature death. The percentage of U.S. adults with obesity has risen steadily from 13.4% in the early 1960s to the current average of more than 42%.
The tiny Asian longhorned tick (left) compared to the common Lonestar tick. CAES News
Asian Longhorned Tick
As of Sept. 21, an invasive and dangerous pest, the Asian longhorned tick, has been confirmed in north Georgia. Experts are warning livestock producers and the public to be on the lookout, as the ticks can kill an animal by attaching to a host by the hundreds.
Using hypothesis-driven data mining, a UGA research team led by Xiangyu Deng of UGA’s Center for Food Safety analyzed over 30,000 genomes of Salmonella Enteritidis obtained from global sources and the international trade of live poultry over five decades. CAES News
Salmonella Study
Researchers at the University of Georgia have provided multifaceted evidence to suggest the likely origins behind the global spread of Salmonella Enteritidis, which has caused recurring outbreaks of the foodborne pandemic linked to poultry products.
The first phase of the EXCITE initiative is to create a communications campaign using testimonial videos. In the videos, provided in both Spanish and English, community members offer firsthand accounts of why they got the vaccine to encourage others to get vaccinated. CAES News
EXCITE Grant
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted ordinary life for millions of people, and rural Georgia was hit especially hard. With hospitals overwhelmed with cases, residents of rural areas found it hard to access care or acquire materials such as face masks and disinfecting wipes.