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Ben Hill County swept the National Consumer Decision Making contest in Denver, Colorado. Team members (left to right) Liam Jay, Ashley Braddy, Lauren Wixson and Timothy Lord display their awards with coach Laura Lee Williams, Ben Hill County Extension 4-H Agent. CAES News
National 4-H Winners
Ben Hill County 4-H’ers Liam Jay, Ashley Braddy, Lauren Wixson and Timothy Lord returned as national champions from the Consumer Decision Making Contest in Denver, Colorado, on Jan. 9. The Ben Hill County team won first place in the overall contest and Lauren Wixson earned the title of High Individual.
Cobb First Place Team CAES News
Winners and Master 4-H'ers
Four high school students from Cobb County took home top honors at the 4-H State Cotton Boll and Consumer Judging contest on Nov. 11, 2021, at Rock Eagle in Eatonton, Georgia. Sandhya Rajesh, Kshitij Badve, Haya Fatmi and Stefan Saboura earned the status of Master 4-H’er with their first-place win at the state level. Alyssa Haag from Oconee County also received Master 4-H’er status as the overall high individual in the contest.
Students learn about salt marsh and beach ecosystems in the Georgia 4-H Environmental Education program at Burton 4-H Center. The center has been providing this important programming to youth and adults in Georgia for 75 years. CAES News
Burton’s 75-year Celebration
The Burton 4-H Center on Tybee Island — an important hub for environmental education and youth development in southeast Georgia — celebrated 75 years of operation on Nov. 1.
Anisa M. Zvonkovic has been named dean of the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. Currently the Harold H. Bate Distinguished Professor and dean of the College of Health and Human Performance at East Carolina University, Zvonkovic will join UGA effective July 1, 2022. CAES News
New FACS Dean
Anisa M. Zvonkovic, an academic leader with a distinguished record of promoting student success and impactful research and outreach, has been named dean of the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
By focusing on one fruit or vegetable per year, UGA Extension agents and teachers can make sure students absorb how to successfully grow that crop. Sign up to participate at bit.ly/livinlavidaokra. CAES News
Farm to School Month
October is Farm to School Month and this year’s theme is Livin’ La Vida Okra. Farm to School Month, coordinated by Georgia Organics in partnership with UGA Extension, highlights a different fruit or vegetable each year.
Tamlin and Mr. 2 17 at Doppler Studios in Atlanta GA CAES News
Hope Givers
This National Suicide Prevention Month, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences alum Tamlin Hall has launched a new documentary series for middle and high schoolers, exploring anxiety, depression, bullying, human trafficking, inclusion and more.
Skipping meals, especially breakfast, can lead to the inability to focus in class, headache or fatigue, and possibly overeating once they make it to a meal or snack. CAES News
Breakfast Tips
We’ve all heard it before, “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” But what really happens when students skip meals?
With so many electronic devices and indoor activities vying for children's time, it's more important than ever for parents to encourage kids to explore the outdoors. CAES News
Play Outside
National Play Outside Day happens a dozen times a year — it's that important. The next occurrence is August 7, and as the summer season winds down, it's a good time to make a habit of active play as a family.
Diane Bales, a UGA Extension human development specialist, says that children who don't get enough sleep can feel irritable and lack concentration. On average, school-aged children need about 12 hours of sleep. CAES News
Sleep Solutions
With homework, activities, increased screen time and other demands, it’s harder than ever to make sure children get enough sleep. But it’s vital to their development. Sometimes behavior problems seem to come out of nowhere, but often it’s as simple as sleep deprivation, said Diane Bales, an associate professor of human development with the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension.