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UGA child development specialist Diane Bales encourages parents to have their kids practice wearing a mask or face covering prior to the start of the school year. CAES News
Mask Tips
If you’re anxious about your child wearing a face covering this fall, you’re not alone.
Parents can help lessen their kids' anxiety about returning to school by talking with them about their concerns and reassuring them that it's normal to be both nervous and excited. Finding out as much as you can about their daily schedules and routines in advance also can help give them more confidence, said UGA child development specialist Diane Bales. CAES News
Preparing for Unknowns
First-day jitters are common, but students returning to school this year during the COVID-19 pandemic will face all sorts of unknowns that could lead to heightened anxiety.
CAES News
COVID-10 Stress
There is a lot of conversation lately about stress and mental well-being, particularly during this time of COVID-19 and sheltering in place. The coronavirus is bringing huge health challenges to our communities and impacts everything from jobs to families. Many things feel like they’re out of our control, and the stress keeps building. 
Walks, jogs or bike rides around the neighborhood or local parks during social distancing are permitted by public health officials, as long as the minimum 6 feet of distance between other people is maintained. CAES News
Home Workouts
Following social distancing guidelines put in place due to COVID-19 doesn’t mean you have to stop being active, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Nutrition and Health Specialist Ali Berg.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018. CAES News
Rural Stress
Farmers are extended family for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents throughout the state, and agents are uniquely positioned to raise awareness about rural stress and mental health concerns for Georgia farmers.
The Dawg Dash 5K is open to all ages and fitness levels and will also include a 1-mile fun run/walk. Prizes will be awarded to the first and second place overall winners and to the first place winners in each age category. CAES News
Dawg Dash
The University of Georgia Griffin campus will hold its inaugural Dawg Dash 5K on Saturday, Nov. 16, at 9 a.m. on the campus located at 1109 Experiment Street in Griffin, Georgia.
A baby sleeps in his crib. Photo taken Aug. 9, 2009. CAES News
Sleep Well
Sleep is your body’s way of restoring itself. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most Americans need at least seven hours of sleep a night.
Some 135 people attended the first UGA’s first Rural Stress Summit held Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta Airport in Atlanta. Sponsored by UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, College of Family and Consumer Sciences and School of Social Work, the event drew participants from 20 states and the District of Columbia and was organized to educate and motivate representatives of state and federal funded groups that serve rural Americans. CAES News
Rural Stress
A farmer driving a tractor over rolling fields of crops ready to harvest is often the idyllic image associated with farm life. In reality, the life of a farmer is often wrought with worry and financial stress due to a variety of factors from crop disease and destructive insects to violent storms, drought, and damaging floods. All of these factors and more contribute to the sobering fact that the suicide rate among farmers is the third highest of any vocational group, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Farming is a career field where you can work long hours, put in overtime, do your pest and still fail. From crop-destroying pests to droughts, floods and hurricanes, many factors can lead to a lost crop and the heavy burden of stress that comes with it. Set for Dec. 10 and 11 in the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport, the “Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions” conference was organized to help experts know how to help rural Americans deal with stressors. CAES News
Rural Stress
Rural Americans, especially those working in agriculture, need more support to help with stressors, and for the treatment of mental illness, addiction and the prevention of suicide, according to Anna M. Scheyett, dean of the University of Georgia’s School of Social Work. Scheyett will join other experts from across the country Dec. 10 and 11 in the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport for a conference titled “Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions.”