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68 results found for Nutrition
Caffeine does not cause an increased risk of heart disease. However, people who have heart disease should consult their health care providers about caffeine intake.
Studies suggest that caffeine intake may protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke. CAES News
Coffee Intake
Many people start their day with a cup of coffee, and that’s not necessarily a bad habit. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers moderate caffeine intake to be 300 milligrams of coffee each day. That’s two to four cups. And studies show that coffee, in moderation, can promote a variety of health benefits.
The University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) has launched a newly revamped website. Known as “Food eTalk,” the program offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes. CAES News
SNAP Website
University of Georgia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed), which offers Georgians free, online nutrition education classes known as “Food eTalk,” has launched a newly revamped website at https://www.foodtalk.org/.
Christen Jackson, a USDA SNAP-Ed educator with UGA Extension in DeKalb County, prepares a healthy pasta dish as part of a nutrition demonstration at the DeKalb County Mobile Market. CAES News
SNAP-Ed
While many people know that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides resources for millions of Americans in need of food assistance, most are less familiar with SNAP Education (SNAP-Ed).
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Mobile Markets
There’s nothing tastier than fresh greens or summer tomatoes from the neighborhood farmers market, but if you can’t make it to a market in metro Atlanta this summer, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has you covered.
CAES News
Clean Eating
Over the past few years, “clean eating” has become a popular way to describe a diet of simple foods, and food manufacturers have taken note. Following consumer demand, food companies have simplified their ingredient lists, introduced clean labeling and started to advertise their products as “clean.”
Most chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), are caused by modifiable behaviors. The three most common risk behaviors for CVD are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and inadequate weight management. Make exercise a family affair to get healthy and spend valuable time together. CAES News
Heart Health
February has arrived. Cue the hearts, flowers and Valentine’s Day festivities. While we have love on the brain, I would like to challenge you to change your perception of love by caring for your heart. February is American Heart Month.
Community supported agriculture is one way to get fresh produce without having to plant a garden. Memberships in a CSA means a farmer gets guaranteed income, and customers get fresh vegetables weekly. Above is an example of a CSA box. CAES News
Healthy Changes
Each year, we set New Year’s goals. Some we achieve, while some are as good as gone by Jan. 2. Just because you fell short last year doesn’t mean it’s not worth trying to make some positive changes this year.
Hope Meeks, a crabber and co-owner of Southside Shellfish in Savannah, teaches a crowd of about 50 about the life cycle and the proper harvest preparation of Georgia blue crabs during an Ocean to Table class taught by UGA Cooperative Extension and UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant in November. CAES News
Christmas Fish Feast
While Christmas dinners in the South usually revolve around a glazed ham or a golden-roasted turkey, families in other parts of the world turn to the sea for their holiday feasts.
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F. CAES News
Grilling Safety
It’s football season, and tailgating before a game is a traditional part of the experience. Unfortunately, grilling your favorite cut of beef means increasing the potential for foodborne illness due to improper handling of food. These reminders from the University of Georgia Meat Science and Technology Center will provide you with grilling skills to keep foodborne illness far from your fall tailgating get-togethers.