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154 results found for Commercial Vegetables
Tomatoes, in varying stages of ripeness, growing on a tomato plant. CAES News
Fruit or Veggie
From an early age, we’re told by our parents to make sure we eat our vegetables. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that people eat five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day. However, there’s long been confusion around what is a vegetable versus a fruit. So, when is a vegetable actually a fruit — or a root or a shoot?
Symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. Brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale, are all susceptible to this plant disease. CAES News
Alternaria blight and head rot
A new multistate project will bring together researchers from the University of Georgia and partner universities to fight Alternaria leaf blight and head rot in broccoli, a plant disease that thrives in warm temperatures and humidity.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's Professor Marc van Iersel, right, is leading an interdisciplinary team which hopes to integrate new lighting technologies, big data and better growing practices to reduce energy costs in greenhouses and plant factories. CAES News
Start-up
The illuminated light bulb. It’s the symbol of a great idea come to life.
Angelos Deltsidis, who is originally from Greece, earned his doctoral degree at the University of Florida. In his new position at UGA, he'll show how commodities thrive under different storage conditions, temperatures and atmospheres. CAES News
Postharvest Specialist
The newest crop specialist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus hopes to help Georgia fruit and vegetable farmers extend the shelf life of their produce after harvest.
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash. CAES News
Whitefly Management
Researchers from three research institutions are using a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fight whiteflies on vegetable crops.
In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags. CAES News
Produce Safety
Over the past decade, Americans have fallen in love with locally grown produce, but just because something is grown nearby doesn’t automatically make it safe.
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring. CAES News
Downy Mildew
Georgia vegetable farmers should be on alert as downy mildew disease has been spotted in at least three southern Georgia counties this spring. Additional counties could follow as weather conditions remain favorable for the disease into early June, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta.
Horticulture Professor Esther van der Knapp of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences worked with a team of geneticists around the world to create a fuller inventory of the genetic diversity of the tomato. They release a pangenome for the tomato in the May edition of Nature Genetics. (photos by Merritt Melancon) CAES News
Tomato Pan-genome
 It’s summer, and Georgia gardeners are anxiously awaiting their first tomato harvest. Just in time for those first tomato sandwiches, researchers at the University of Georgia have helped unlock the mystery of what separates today’s tomatoes from their inedible ancestors.
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light. CAES News
Unseasonably Hot
Georgia’s vegetable growers need to irrigate more frequently as unseasonably high temperatures are forecast to remain high with little to no rainfall expected. Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, said it is urgent that vegetable producers heed this advice.