Menu

Browse Field Crops, Forage and Turfgrass Production Stories - Page 21

650 results found for Field Crops, Forage and Turfgrass Production
Michelle Momany, professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, and Marin Brewer, associate professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Plant Pathology, recently received a $197,798 contract from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study antifungal resistance in agricultural settings. Their study will focus on Aspergillus fungi, which can cause crop loss and dangerous lung infections in those with compromised immune systems. CAES News
Fungicide Resistance
There are a limited number of compounds available to combat fungal infections in both plants and people. A team of University of Georgia researchers is helping to assess the risk posed by fungi developing widespread resistance to the stable of antifungal compounds used in the United States.
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Pesticide Drift
No official pesticide drift complaints have been reported to the Georgia Department of Agriculture this year due to in-season applications of dicamba, or 2,4-D.
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, conducts research on turfgrass and ornamental plant pests. Joseph also works with UGA Cooperative Extension agents and teaches an entomology laboratory course for UGA students enrolled in the plant protection and pest management master's degree program. CAES News
New Entomologist
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, will research turfgrass and ornamental plant pests as the newest member of the UGA Turfgrass Team.
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Conservation Tillage
Conservation tillage saves farmers time and money and improves the soil, but only 20 or 30 percent of Georgia farmers use this system, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension soils and fertility specialist Glen Harris.
David Daughtry, University of Georgia Tifton campus graduate research assistant and licensed drone pilot, speaks to local elementary school students about agricultural uses for drones during the Agricultural and Environmental Awareness Day held in May 2017. CAES News
Agricultural Awareness Day
On Tuesday, Oct. 24, approximately 900 fourth-graders from Georgia’s Tift and Cook counties will convene on the University of Georgia Tifton campus for this fall's Agricultural and Environmental Awareness Day.
University of Georgia President Jere W. Morehead (right) and 2017 Georgia Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Farmer of the Year Everett Williams (left) are pictured at the 40th annual Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, Georgia, on Tuesday, Oct. 17. CAES News
Sunbelt Expo
University of Georgia President Jere W. Morehead discussed the future of Georgia agriculture with industry leaders at the 40th annual Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, Georgia, on Tuesday, Oct. 17.
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Hay Contest
With more than 328 entries in this year’s Southeastern Hay Contest (SEHC), competition was fierce among farms that pride themselves on fine hay. 
In the foreground of the peanut field, crown rot leaves considerable damage, compared to a good stand of peanuts with clean seed. CAES News
Aspergillus Crown Rot
Aspergillus crown rot disease is on the rise in Georgia peanut fields and University of Georgia researchers are working to pinpoint why. At present, university scientists recommend that farmers encountering this problem in their fields stop saving seed from year to year in an effort to reduce the disease while better control methods are found. The first line of defense has been fungicide application either in furrow or directly to the seed.
Cotton plants blown over from Tropical Storm Irma's winds on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Cotton Crop
Georgia’s cotton crop sustained at least $100 million in losses following Irma’s trek across the state, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist Jared Whitaker.