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Browse Plant Pests and Diseases Stories - Page 10

230 results found for Plant Pests and Diseases
Harald Scherm, professor of plant pathology and assistant dean for research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will take over as department head for plant pathology on July 1, 2016. CAES News
Plant Pathology Head
After nearly two decades helping farmers combat the diseases affecting Georgia’s most prominent fruit crops, Professor Harald Scherm has been appointed head of the University of Georgia’s Department of Plant Pathology following a national search.
When using pesticides, remember that the safe and legal use of pesticides requires that the entire label be followed exactly. Contact your local Extension agent if you're unsure about a product. CAES News
Pesticide Collection
A pesticide collection event has been scheduled for Wednesday, June 29, at the Southern Pines Ag and Expo in Dublin, Georgia. The event will be held from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.
University of Georgia researchers are studying the effectiveness of applying a Bacillus bacteria species to the stigmas of female flowers to slow the spread of bacterial fruit blotch from seed to seedling. CAES News
Battling Blotch
Georgia farmers struggle to control bacterial fruit blotch (BFB), but University of Georgia plant pathologists have discovered that naturally occurring bacteria can combat the disease.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Insect Scouting
Georgia farmers and agriculture consultants hoping to refine their scouting skills are invited to this year’s Insect Scout Schools, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. The schools will be held in Tifton on Monday, June 13, and in Midville on Tuesday, June 21.
Georgia strawberry farmers typically spray fungicides to control Botrytis and anthracnose (shown), two fungi that cause fruit rot. University of Georgia researchers are testing a mobile app, created by University of Florida scientists, that uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for diseases. CAES News
Strawberry App
University of Georgia and University of Florida researchers are testing the Strawberry Advisory System in Georgia strawberry fields. SAS, an app created, in part, by UF plant pathologist Natalia Peres, uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for Botrytis and anthracnose, two fungi that cause fruit rot on strawberries.
Georgia's April 2016 Precipitation - NOAA CAES News
April Weather
Cool conditions early in April delayed the growth of watermelon seedlings and caused yellowing of some corn plants. Wet fields in the southern half of the state delayed planting and caused problems for corn seedlings and other plants in heavy, wet soils.
This is a partially reconstructed point-cloud of a peanut field. When completed, UGA scientists will be able to tell the height, width, leaf cover, growth and disease anomolies for individual plants and track it through the season. Currently the research project is working to make the 3-d reconstruction accurate to within 1 mm. CAES News
3-D Images
University of Georgia scientist Glen Rains is combining 3-D images and robotics to help farmers identify crop problems before they become an issue that will affect potential yields.
Overwintering kudzu bugs discovered in pine bark. CAES News
Kudzu Bug Decline
Once a nuisance for soybean farmers in the Southeast, kudzu bug populations appear to be declining in the U.S. The decline began in 2014 and is believed to have been brought on by two of the kudzu bug’s natural predators: a fungus and a wasp.
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens. CAES News
Organic Farming Classes
University of Georgia organic agriculture experts and economists are teaming up to present the Organic Farming Workshop to provide farmers with new ways to maximize the ecology and economical sustainability of their farm.