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Browse Plant Pests and Diseases Stories - Page 7

228 results found for Plant Pests and Diseases
Spotted wing drosophila on a blueberry. CAES News
Spotted wing drosophila
University of Georgia entomologist Ashfaq Sial advises Georgia blueberry farmers to manage the spotted wing drosophila (SWD), the crop’s most destructive pest, by incorporating cultural practices into farming.
In the foreground of the peanut field, crown rot leaves considerable damage, compared to a good stand of peanuts with clean seed. CAES News
Aspergillus Crown Rot
Aspergillus crown rot disease is on the rise in Georgia peanut fields and University of Georgia researchers are working to pinpoint why. At present, university scientists recommend that farmers encountering this problem in their fields stop saving seed from year to year in an effort to reduce the disease while better control methods are found. The first line of defense has been fungicide application either in furrow or directly to the seed.
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. CAES News
Blueberry Production
Nematode control is one of the costliest hurdles to blueberry production on replanted sites. Through research trials in Appling County, Georgia, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Shane Curry found that adding pine bark mulch when replanting blueberry fields helps to combat the pests.
Cucurbit leaf crumple virus, a disease carried by whiteflies, infects vegetable plants like squash (pictured). CAES News
Whitefly management
Summer may have ended, but Georgia’s silverleaf whitefly infestation has not.
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies
Populations of whiteflies are “unusually high” in Georgia cotton fields this season, making early detection and management of whiteflies essential, according to University of Georgia entomologists Phillip Roberts and Stormy Sparks.
Since about half of Georgia's peanuts are produced on dry land, or land without access to irrigation, growers rely on rain to produce a good crop. CAES News
Burrower Bug
Through part of a $12.1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney is studying the biology of the burrower bug and developing an effective management program.
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood. CAES News
Invasive Species
Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Think Ahead
Georgia’s hot, muggy summers provide the perfect conditions for diseases to thrive in. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little says the secret to fighting diseases in homegrown vegetables is to stay a few steps ahead of them.
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Squash Struggles
Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.