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230 results found for Plant Pests and Diseases
A native of Ghana, Maxwell Lamptey is visiting the University of Georgia in the hopes of learning new methods of fighting aflatoxin—a carcinogen produced by soil fungus that can grow on peanuts. Lamprey is working alongside UGA food scientist Jinru Chen on the university's campus in Griffin, Ga. He is studying different methods of solar drying peanuts. CAES News
Killing Aflatoxin
Maxwell Lamptey is visiting America, specifically Griffin, Georgia, in the hopes of learning new methods to fight aflatoxin — a carcinogen produced by soil fungus that can grow on peanuts — in his home country of Ghana.
Seth Byrd holds a piece of rye on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Cotton Cover Crop
Georgia cotton farmers can benefit from using rye as a cover crop, according to scientists on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus. Along with providing an added defense against glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth at planting, rye significantly reduces thrips infestations and could save farmers irrigation expenses.
Pictured are dug up peanut plants on a dry land peanut field in east Tift County on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. CAES News
Peanut Scouting
Mark Abney’s message to Georgia peanut farmers is the same today as it was two years ago, when he was hired as the University of Georgia’s research and Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist: “We need to be scouting more of our peanuts.”
The groundbreaking ceremony for the University of Georgia's new turfgrass research and education facilities included, left to right, UGA doctoral student Becky Grubbs; Pamela Whitten, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost; Griff Doyle, vice president for government relations; Jennifer Frum, vice president for public service and outreach; Rep. Terry England (R-Auburn); Tommy Hopkins, regent of the University System of Georgia; UGA President Jere W. Morehead; Scott Angle, dean and director of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Ken Morrow, president of Sod Atlanta Inc.; and Sen. John Wilkinson (R-Dist.50). CAES News
New Turf Facilities
More than 200 people gathered June 24 for a groundbreaking ceremony that brought new turfgrass research and education facilities on the University of Georgia’s campuses in Griffin, Tifton and Athens one step closer to completion.
Screen shot of Turfgrass Management iPhone application. Developed by Patrick McCullough July 2009. CAES News
Lawn Care Apps
Summertime is synonymous with cooking outdoors, taking a dip in the pool and cranking up the lawn mower to begin the arduous task of caring for your home lawn. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has made the task a little easier through a few mobile apps for Georgia homeowners and green industry professionals alike.
Pictured is a cotton plant impacted by thrips damage. CAES News
Thrips Management
University of Georgia researchers are studying management strategies for thrips, a pest that cotton and peanut farmers encounter every year.
Jason Schmidt is UGA Tifton's newest entomologist. CAES News
UGA Entomologist
The University of Georgia’s newest entomologist is eyeing a different approach to studying insects in multiple agricultural crops. Instead of focusing on how to eliminate pests that reduce yield and negatively impact profits, UGA entomologist Jason Schmidt is looking to improve agricultural management systems to preserve helpful insects.
Sawfly damage on roses CAES News
Rose Sawflies
Dozens of calls and samples of roses with a variety of leaf problems are coming into the University of Georgia Extension office in Bartow County. The most common problem diagnosed this year is injury caused by rose sawflies, also known as rose slugs.
The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, can be found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest if it gets to cotton fields and blueberry patches. CAES News
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug
A University of Georgia entomologist is asking Georgians to help track an insect that loves to stowaway in homes and has the potential to hurt the state’s cotton and blueberry crops. The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, was first spotted in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1998 and has since been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest, too.