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A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Lowndes County Extension Coordinator Jacob Price looks at a Satsuma orange plant on a private farm in Lowndes County in 2015. CAES News
Satsuma Oranges
Consumers with a sweet spot for satsuma oranges can expect to see south Georgia oranges on the market in 2017, according to Jacob Price, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent and Lowndes County Extension coordinator. That’s because south Georgia satsumas trees are a little more than a year away from producing fruit.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.
Here is a picture of a  peach tree orchard. CAES News
Peach Pest Management
University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen is concerned that Georgia peach growers can’t tell the difference between phony peach disease and weevil or nematode damage. A consequence could be that farmers unnecessarily destroy trees and potential fruit.
Pictured are three blackberry leaves that have Blackberry Yellow Vein Virus. CAES News
Blackberry Viruses
With no chemical treatments to kill viruses in blackberries, University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen recommends Georgia producers grow tissue-cultured plants.
December 2015 was much warmer than normal across the southeastern United States. CAES News
December 2015
2015 saw one of the warmest Decembers since Georgians started keeping records, and the month was also much wetter than normal. The warm, wet conditions created havoc for Georgia farmers.
UGA peanut geneticist Peggy Ozias-Akins, director of the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, examines a peanut blossom. Ozias-Akin's lab on the UGA Tifton Campus focuses on female reproduction and gene transfer in plants. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Awards
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will recognize nine of its finest next month with the D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence and the CAES Faculty and Staff Support Awards.
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. CAES News
Female farmers
Women own 13.6 percent of America’s active farms and their farms produce almost $13 billion worth of goods each year. Just like male farmers, they need access to business and technical information to help make their farms successful. But while many pride themselves on not needing a “women’s only” class on how to work the land or run a business, many other women simply feel more comfortable learning around other female farmers.
Satsuma oranges are grown predominantly in Alabama, Louisiana and California. CAES News
Satsumas
Fruit growers are encouraged to attend a satsuma orange production and fruit marketing meeting at the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office in Lowndes County on Wednesday, Sept. 9, at 9:30 a.m.