Menu

Browse Commercial Fruit Stories - Page 2

82 results found for Commercial Fruit
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands. CAES News
Produce Training
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture will host a free one-day workshop for produce farmers on Thursday, March 14, at Little Ocmulgee State Park in Helena, Georgia.
August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible. CAES News
Grape Growers
With the growth and increased marketability of the state’s wine industry, Athens, Georgia, is hosting new conferences that will focus on how to create quality fruit and turn it into a palatable beverage. The Southeastern Regional New Grape Growers Conference will be held at the University of Georgia’s South Milledge Greenhouse Complex in Athens on Dec. 11.
Cantaloupes being grown at UGA-Tifton. CAES News
Cantaloupes
University of Georgia scientists are assisting in a study to find a cantaloupe variety with less netting on the rind in the hopes that the fruit will be less susceptible to the bacteria or pathogens that settle in the netting on the outside of the fruit.
When collecting wild raspberry seeds in Australia, University of Georgia scientist Rachel Itle first had to “calibrate” her eyes to search for the tiny, red berries. This, made finding them easier, but the wild berries were not plentiful. Some were bright red, some dull red and some golden, and the fruit is about a half or a fourth the size of commercial berries sold in the U.S., she said. CAES News
New Fruit
University of Georgia horticulturists Rachel Itle and Dario Chavez recently travelled to Australia to collect seeds from wild raspberries and peaches to bring back to the UGA Griffin campus. As scientists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Itle and Chavez research Georgia-grown fruit.
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Water Summits
Water summits in Tifton, Georgia, this week and across the U.S. provide fruit and vegetable growers with an opportunity to discuss water use on farms and simplification of existing water regulation standards with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials.
Deer are beautiful creatures, but seeing them dining on your landscape plants quickly makes their beauty fade. CAES News
Deer Problem
Georgia’s whitetail deer have reached a nutritional stress period and the current drought situation only compounds the issue. There tends to be two nutritional stress periods during the year for whitetail: the end of summer and the end of winter. Right now, we are at the precipice of the winter stress period.
As of Dec. 27, 2016, this map of Georgia shows areas that are experiencing abnormally dry or drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Image credit: USDA Drought Monitor. CAES News
Georgia Drought
Welcome rains during December 2016 and the first week of 2017 are providing hope for Georgia farmers looking for relief from a statewide severe drought, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia agricultural climatologist and UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016. CAES News
Greenhouses and High Tunnels
From the miracle of December tomatoes to the marvel of fresh salad greens in space, greenhouses and growth chambers may play an increasing role in creating hyperlocal or hyperportable food systems.
Georgia strawberry farmers typically spray fungicides to control Botrytis and anthracnose (shown), two fungi that cause fruit rot. University of Georgia researchers are testing a mobile app, created by University of Florida scientists, that uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for diseases. CAES News
Strawberry App
University of Georgia and University of Florida researchers are testing the Strawberry Advisory System in Georgia strawberry fields. SAS, an app created, in part, by UF plant pathologist Natalia Peres, uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for Botrytis and anthracnose, two fungi that cause fruit rot on strawberries.