Menu

Browse Trees Stories - Page 7

127 results found for Trees
Fall is not the best time to prune most trees and shrubs. It is best to wait until late winter, around February or early March. CAES News
Winter Projects
Bleak winter landscapes and cold, uninviting temperatures can try a gardener’s patience. It doesn’t have to be that way.
When transplanting a tree, dig the new hole 50 percent wider than the soil ball to loosen the surrounding soil and ensure good root establishment. The root system should be at the same depth it was before it was moved. CAES News
Protect Bare Roots
Landscape planting season is upon us and home gardeners may be eager to buy new fruit trees and ornamentals. New plant material is often produced bare root — without soil — and must be either kept in cold storage or temporarily planted outdoors to survive.
Michael Dirr, professor emeritus of horticulture at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, was recently inducted into the National Academy of Inventors. CAES News
Academic Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors has inducted Michael Dirr, professor emeritus of horticulture in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, into the 2014 class of NAI Fellows.
Green acorns lie beneath a tree on the University of Georgia campus in Tifton, Ga. Many species of wildlife can eat acorns with no ill effects, but cows can contract acorn poisoning from eating too many - especially the green ones. CAES News
No green acorns
Squirrels, birds and small wildlife are known to dine on acorns. Cows, on the other hand, can eat a few acorns, but too many can cause deadly acorn—or “Quercus”—poisoning.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Rearranging Shrubs
Fall and early winter are the best time to relocate large trees and shrubs. Moving established plants from one location to another can change your landscape without costing you money.
A redbud tree (cercis spp.) blooms during springtime on the UGA Griffin Campus CAES News
Tree care class
Tree care, from diseases to selection, will be the focus of an upcoming University of Georgia symposium set for Aug. 21 at the DeKalb County Extension office in Decatur.
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree. CAES News
Fig Pest
Backyard fig gardeners may be seeing toothpick-like spines protruding from their beloved fig trees. This is a sign that ambrosia beetles are boring into the tree’s stems.
CAES News
Planting for Drought Tolerance
While Georgia is not currently experiencing drought conditions, it still makes good environmental sense to select drought-tolerant larger shrubs as the cornerstones of your landscape design.
Dario Chavez, the University of Georgia's new peach specialist, holds a few of the first crop of 2014 Georgia peaches. CAES News
Peach Specialist
As the University of Georgia’s new peach specialist, Dario Chavez’s first order of business is to listen. While he’s waiting for the new research orchard on the UGA Griffin Campus to be planted and develop, Chavez is hearing what Georgia peach growers have to say and planning projects to meet their needs.