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A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Springlike weather throughout the state cause ornamental shrubs and trees to bloom early. These azaleas blossomed the week before Christmas in Hart County. CAES News
Pruning Patience
With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged some of these early signs of life. But there’s still hope for those way-too-early bloomers. The key is to be patient and wait to see what happens.
Christmas plants, like these Christmas cacti and Norfolk Island pine, can make the perfect gift for the green thumbs on your holiday list. CAES News
Living Christmas Trees
Container-grown or balled-and-burlapped Christmas trees can be planted as landscape trees after the holidays. This way of enjoying a Christmas tree is practical in Georgia, where the mild December or early January weather is ideal for tree planting. With care and planning, your Christmas tree will serve as a living memory for many years.
Freshly cut Christmas trees lined up for purchase at the Lowe's Home Improvement store in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Christmas Trees
Before buying a pre-cut Christmas tree, put it through a few freshness tests, says University of Georgia Extension Agent Adam Speir. Christmas trees can be kept healthy and green through the holidays by following these tips.
Conks, fibrous but sometimes fleshy fruiting bodies of a wood-rotting fungus, grow on a tree CAES News
Tree Decay
Wood-rotting organisms can slowly nibble away at tree trunks and buttress roots. Many trees that topple look perfectly healthy before they fall. Afterward, it becomes clear that there were absolutely no structural roots remaining for support.
Fall is the perfect time to install new trees or shrubs or to move existing ones to new locations. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend digging the planting hole two to three times the diameter of the soil ball. CAES News
Tree Planting
The transition of leaf color symbolizes an end to the growing season, but it is the best time of year to start trees in our landscape. When correctly sited and planted, a fall-planted tree will perform better than a spring-planted tree because the fall tree will establish roots before the warm summer temperatures draw moisture from and cause stress to the tree.
University of Georgia agricultural specialist Robbie Beck clears a plot of land on the UGA Westbrook Farm in preparation for the Sept. 17 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day. CAES News
Agroforestry & Wildlife Field Day
Controlling coyotes and clearing trees will top the list of popular topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day on Thursday, Sept. 17, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia. CAES News
Chainsaw Safety
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is presenting chainsaw trainings designed to educate Georgia’s landscape and tree care workers on the safe use of chainsaws.
Oak leaf blister (Taphrina caerulescens). www.ipmimages.org CAES News
Oak Leaf Blister
Most fungal pathogens that infect leaves prefer cool, moist conditions during leaf expansion in early spring. The leaf spot disease seen most often on oak trees this year is caused by a fungus known as Taphrina caerulescens, or oak leaf blister.