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Norman Winter, director of the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia. CAES News
"Garden Guru"
Known across the South as the “Garden Guru,” Norman Winter has been writing about his passion for gardening for the past 20 years. Starting this week, his gardening columns will be distributed to media across the state by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Greenhouse and nursery growers from across the southeastern United States converged in Athens June 12-15 for the inaugural Academy of Crop Production hosted by the UGA Department of Horticulture. Part of the program included the annual Industry Open House at the Trial Gardens at UGA. CAES News
Academy of Crop Production
From unmanned aerial vehicles to remote-sensing greenhouse control systems, nursery and greenhouse growers explored the future of the green industry as part of the inaugural Academy of Crop Production (ACP), held June 12-15 in Athens, Georgia.
A nursery grower examines plants growing at the Trial Gardens at UGA. The gardens will hold a public open house July 9. CAES News
Trial Gardens Open House
Each year the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia tests hundreds of new ornamental plants before they reach local garden centers.
Jim Robbins, University of Arkansas, will present on using unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAVs or drones, in "Drones in Production – Inventory Management and Stress Detection" at UGA Extension's Academy of Plant Production, June 12-15 in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Academy of Crop Production
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Green Industry Association are inviting veteran nursery and greenhouse growers to “get nerdy” with them this summer at the inaugural Academy of Crop Production, June 12-15 at Hotel Indigo in Athens, Georgia.
Yard bird art adorns a theme garden at the Georgia Research and Education Garden on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Curb Appeal
Whether driving in our own neighborhood or going to visit friends or relatives, we all tend to compare our home landscape to others. There’s no denying that a well-landscaped house is very appealing to the eye and can make a home more inviting.
CAES horticulture professor Tim Smalley leads his students on a walking plant ID tour on the UGA campus in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Tim Smalley Honored
Tim Smalley, associate professor of horticulture in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named a Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professors, the university’s highest recognition for excellence in instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
Katharine Rose Hall, a senior studying communication sciences and disorders in the UGA College of Education, juxtaposed the crown of a North Campus Ginkgo tree with one of the UGA Holmes-Hunter Academic Building's Corinthian columns in her first place photo. CAES News
UGA Campus Arboretum
The University of Georgia Campus Arboretum Initiative, sponsored by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Department of Horticulture, has announced the winners of its 2015 Memorable UGA Campus Trees and Shrubs Photo Competition.
A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Springlike weather throughout the state cause ornamental shrubs and trees to bloom early. These azaleas blossomed the week before Christmas in Hart County. CAES News
Pruning Patience
With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged some of these early signs of life. But there’s still hope for those way-too-early bloomers. The key is to be patient and wait to see what happens.