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Browse Trees Stories - Page 11

129 results found for Trees
A row of pines at the Westbrook Research Farm on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day
Land is a valuable resource and provides immense benefits to humans and to wildlife. Landowners, farmers or sportsmen who wish to increase the value and benefits of the land they own, hunt or manage should make plans to attend the 2012 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 at the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.
Leyland cypress trees grow as a property border in a lawn in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Thirsty trees
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Frank Watson discusses the best ways, and time, to water new and drought-stricken trees.
A redbud tree (cercis spp.) blooms during springtime on the UGA Griffin Campus CAES News
Planting new additions
If you are planning to add to new plant material to your landscape, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists recommend keeping a few things in mind before you dig your first shovel-full of dirt.
Pears hang from a tree in a middle Georgia home landscape. CAES News
Home orchards
Growing fruit trees in the home garden can be an enjoyable, relaxing and rewarding experience. However, success takes careful planning and hard work.
Fall is not the best time to prune most trees and shrubs. It is best to wait until late winter, around February or early March. CAES News
Pruning tips
Learn proper pruning techniques, what equipment to use and more through up-coming courses on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.
Hemlock wood adelgids on an Eastern hemlock branch CAES News
Hemlock pest
Thousands of broken trees line the banks of the Chattooga River. The dead gray stabs were once evergreen monsters offering shade to trout and picturesque views to visitors. These Eastern hemlocks are dying rapidly, and University of Georgia researchers are working to save them.
Mistletoe grows on a pear tree in Butts County, Ga. CAES News
Mistletoe = parasite
Mistletoe is often used postmortem to lure unsuspecting sweethearts to a Christmastime kiss. For the other 364 days of the year, it is actually considered an infectious parasite that kills trees.
Engraver beetles leave pin-sized holds in the bark of pine trees when they exit the tree. CAES News
Pine bark beetles
Pine bark beetles can be the death of pines in forests and home landscapes.
Consider size when adding crape myrtles to your landscape. CAES News
Tree planting time
Arbor Day isn’t until February, but now is the ideal time to add new trees to your landscape.