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Browse Irrigation Stories - Page 3

54 results found for Irrigation
Rye and clover grow side by side in a research plot on cover crops at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville. CAES News
Cover Crops
Georgia’s recent drought led University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist Wes Porter to caution farmers about planting cover crops this winter.
A soil moisture sensor in a cornfield behind NESPAL on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Sensor Placement
Knowing the best place to install soil moisture sensors in fields, and how many, helps farmers optimize their water use, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
CAES News
Soaker Hoses
During long periods without rain, landscape plants and trees can suffer permanent damage. Supplying water slowly and gradually from below is the best way to help them survive, as this method has much less potential for evaporation than overhead irrigation.
Chemigation treatments on cotton in a UGA research trial. CAES News
Chemigation
Pesticide application through center pivot irrigation systems, called “chemigation,” could allow Georgia cotton growers to treat multiple fields while lowering application costs and minimizing exposure to chemicals. University of Georgia entomologist Michael Toews is studying the efficacy of this method.
Endue Brown, a Sumter County 4-H'er, collects water from an irrigation pivot during a previous 4-H20 camp. CAES News
4-H20 Camp
A blend of fun and education, the Mitchell County 4-H20 day camp is designed to introduce students to the importance of water conservation and irrigation. The three-day camp is held every year, and will include a visit to the University of Georgia C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia, on June 22.
An overhead view of variable rate irrigation and soil moisture sensor research at Adam McLendon's farm. CAES News
Variable Rate Irrigation
The combination of soil moisture sensors and variable rate irrigation (VRI) may help some Georgia farmers increase their yields while decreasing their water usage, according to an ongoing study by University of Georgia precision agriculture specialist George Vellidis and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Spring Irrigation
Leaky pipes, flat tires and rodent-infested electrical boxes are issues that should be addressed now by farmers with irrigation systems, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Irrigation Scheduling
To better conserve water, as well as abide by federal regulations regarding the use of irrigation, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert encourages Georgia farmers to develop an irrigation scheduling strategy.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Irrigation In Peanuts
Georgia peanut farmers can’t control rainfall or the recent deluge the state received over the last week. They can, however, control how much water they apply to their crops through irrigation. A University of Georgia researcher believes applying too much water to peanuts can invite diseases and reduce yields.