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54 results found for Irrigation
A young visitor to the UGA Pavilion at the 2011 Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Ga., Oct. 19 learns about giant cockroaches. CAES News
Expo weathers on
Despite an uncomfortable mix of wet, cold and windy weather, North America’s premier farm show, the Sunbelt Ag Expo, marched on this week in Moultrie, Ga. More than 70,000 visitors perused the wears of 1,200 vendors, a North Carolina farmer was tapped as the Southeast’s top and land-grant universities brought their messages to the masses.
GAEMN weather station on the Stripling Irrigation Park in Camilla, Ga. CAES News
Monitoring weather
The Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, operated by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is in jeopardy due to key faculty and funding losses. Georgia farmers depend on the network for weather, soil and water information that helps them make the quick decisions needed to efficiently produce their crops.
CAES News
Summer dries Georgia
The current La Niña pattern is associated with dry and warm winters across much of the Southeast.
Plant pathologist Lee Burpee discusses disease control at the 2008 UGA Turfgrass Field Day. CAES News
Turfgrass field day
If caring for turfgrass is in your job description, the University of Georgia has planned an event just for you. The UGA Turfgrass Field Day will be filled with everything you ever wanted to know about turfgrass and much more.
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering. CAES News
Rules not as strict as during drought
New watering rules give Georgians more flexibility in their watering habits. Effective June 1, they can now run automated irrigation systems, lawn sprinklers or water by hand daily as long as they do so from 4 p.m. until 10 a.m.
Uneven watering can cause fruit split, as can a combination of low temperature and slow to fast growth due to changing environmental conditions and increased nitrogen application. Split starts small, getting progressively larger as fruit size increases. CAES News
Veggie problems
There is nothing more frustrating than planting a vegetable garden and not producing a substantial crop. Numerous problems can contribute to low yields, but, fortunately, most of them can be avoided.
Butterfly Weed is a native herbaceous perennial that attracts butterflies like magnets with its florescent orange blooms. CAES News
Spring gardening
Welcome to the 35th annual Spring Garden Packet from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Written by CAES faculty, editors and graduate and undergraduate students, these articles are provided to help you with timely, valuable statewide gardening information.
In early spring, stink bugs emerge and migrate to developing crops. They linger along the way, feeding, looking for companionship and building populations in early-maturing crops like corn. CAES News
Stink bug travel habits
In recent years, the stink bug has become a major problem for Georgia crops, particularly in cotton fields, where it costs farmers millions in losses annually. To develop more efficient methods to control the pest, a University of Georgia researcher wants to learn more about it, especially its travel habits.
CAES News
Permit contact
The Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission needs updated contact information for farmers who use irrigation in the Suwannee and Ochlockonee watershed in south-central Georgia.