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Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
COVID-19 continues food chain disruption, causing closure of several meat and poultry processors
While many were watching the price of poultry, workers in processing plants began testing positive for COVID-19, causing temporary shutdowns at more than 30 meat processing facilities across the nation, according to MEAT+POULTRY’s website, which has been mapping the cases. Together, that caused a complex problem for the poultry industry and for consumers.
Emma Wilson sewing masks CAES News
Emma Wilson sewing masks
Georgia 4-H'er uses Project Achievement skills to sew masks for children
With the current shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as masks, children visiting the hospital for emergency needs do not have proper protection from COVID-19. Emma Wilson, a 10-year-old from Hancock County, is using her 4-H Project Achievement skills to help by sewing masks specifically for children.
Native wildflowers grow in field margins. CAES News
Native wildflowers grow in field margins.
UGA entomologist's advice to increase on-farm biodiversity
The future of food and farms is largely dependent on the collective effort of us all to support more sustainable practices in agriculture — it’s not enough to just be profitable. Agricultural lands have the potential to be some of the most biodiverse landscapes in our increasingly urbanized world.   
Georgia producers eager to sell fresh produce are being connected with buyers who need their products through UGA Extension partnership with Georgia Grown. CAES News
Georgia producers eager to sell fresh produce are being connected with buyers who need their products through UGA Extension partnership with Georgia Grown.
UGA Extension and Georgia Department of Agriculture seek to help farmers get produce to public
Georgia farmers and agricultural producers eager to sell abundant supplies of fresh produce and other products are being connected with consumers and other buyers who need their products through a new partnership between University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture’s Georgia Grown program.
Nick Robertson, this year’s University of Georgia Food, Agribusiness and Entrepreneurial Initiative (FABricate) winner, started Rare Combinations to develop an efficient, affordable alcohol percentage detector for beverage producers. The senior biochemical engineering major will receive a $10,000 investment toward his business from the contest. CAES News
Nick Robertson, this year’s University of Georgia Food, Agribusiness and Entrepreneurial Initiative (FABricate) winner, started Rare Combinations to develop an efficient, affordable alcohol percentage detector for beverage producers. The senior biochemical engineering major will receive a $10,000 investment toward his business from the contest.
Engineering student wins UGA FABricate entrepreneurial contest with alcohol percentage detector
Many businesses are formed to solve problems for others, but one engineering student’s prize-winning idea spurred from a challenge he faced in his own kombucha business.
UGArden Farm Manager JoHannah Biang practices safety guidelines imposed due to the COVID-19 crisis while harvesting greens for distribution to food insecure families in the Athens, Georgia, area. CAES News
UGArden Farm Manager JoHannah Biang practices safety guidelines imposed due to the COVID-19 crisis while harvesting greens for distribution to food insecure families in the Athens, Georgia, area.
UGA’s student community farm continues to provide produce to those in need, plants for home gardeners
At UGArden, the University of Georgia’s student community farm, plots of lettuce, kale, beets, carrots and greens planted during the winter wait to be harvested. Despite the absence of dozens of student workers due to the campus closure prompted by the COVID-19 crisis, a handful of staff at the garden are keeping fresh produce flowing out into the community to benefit food-insecure families.
Many foods have to be cooked to safe minimum internal temperatures to be safe to eat. Use a clean, calibrated, accurate food thermometer to make sure meat and poultry are cooked to a proper temperature, and keep a minimum cooking temperatures chart handy. CAES News
Many foods have to be cooked to safe minimum internal temperatures to be safe to eat. Use a clean, calibrated, accurate food thermometer to make sure meat and poultry are cooked to a proper temperature, and keep a minimum cooking temperatures chart handy.
Prepare food safely to avoid foodborne illness while sheltering in place
Usual daily routines have been disrupted by the current COVID-19 crisis and many people are spending more time cooking at home than before. While our health is always on our minds, it is important to maintain safe food handling at this time so our lives are not further complicated by foodborne illness. 
Georgia 4-H 1st Vistual Project Achievement CAES News
Georgia 4-H 1st Vistual Project Achievement
More than 45 Georgia counties participate in Georgia 4-H Virtual Project Achievement
More than 425 fourth, fifth and sixth graders participated in Georgia 4-H’s recent Virtual Cloverleaf Project Achievement contest. In response to the cancellation of five area Project Achievement contests due to the COVID-19 crisis, Georgia 4-H faculty and staff quickly developed the Virtual Project Achievement Contest.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Access to dairy critical for children during school closures, UGA Extension expert says
Widespread school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic have raised concerns about students’ lack of access to milk.

About the Newswire

The CAES newswire features the latest popular science and lifestyle stories relating to agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences as well as UGA Extension programs and services around the state.

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