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UGA Assistant Professor and Extension Precision Ag Specialist Simer Virk will be among the faculty members from UGA and peer institutions who will present on adopting agricultural technologies during two Utilizing Precision Ag Technology Workshops being held in late March. CAES News
Precision Agriculture Workshops
Registration is open through March 18 for the upcoming Utilizing Precision Ag Technology Workshop being presented by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension on March 29 and 31.
Sustainable agriculture experts at the University of Georgia are offering a two-day intensive workshop March 23 and 24 to help small growers make the most of the upcoming season and build their farms into strong, productive businesses. CAES News
Sustainability Calculator
The muddy waters of what is considered “sustainable” are clearing up with the implementation of a new calculator that gives agricultural producers a reliable method to quantify a farm's sustainability.
Mark McCann (from left) joins Justin Pate, Christian Pate, Scotty Raines, Melanie Raines, Celie Raines, Guy Hancock and CAES Dean Nick Place at a celebration announcing Scotty Raines' selection as 2022 Georgia Farmer of the Year during the annual meeting of the Georgia Agribusiness Council.  CAES News
2022 Georgia Farmer Of The Year
For Scotty Raines, the best part of farming is watching the fruits of his labor — witnessing those tiny seeds crack through the ground, bursting with life. Awe and dedication have paid off for Raines, who was just recognized with the title of 2022 Georgia Farmer of the Year by the Georgia Agribusiness Council.
Angelos Deltsidis is an assistant professor with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' horticulture department. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
Reducing Food Waste
When Angelos Deltsidis isn’t in the lab or in the field, he can usually be found on the road or trail, putting in miles on a long run through nature. But his runs aren’t simply spent enjoying the greenery—he is also focusing on what the plants produce, how they do it and gathering research ideas. He is finding inspiration.
UGA horticulture scientist Ye Juliet Chu is the latest peanut researcher in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to produce three breeding lines from peanut’s wild relatives. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Disease-Resistant Hybrids
Using proven production practices to fight disease in the field, Georgia farmers produce half the peanuts grown in the U.S. each year. Modern peanut varieties carry few genetic defenses against some of the more devastating diseases, so peanut farmers carefully consider when to plant, whether to irrigate and when to apply fungicide and insecticide to keep those diseases from infecting the plant.
UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has a fall 2020 undergraduate enrollment of 1,456, and a graduate/professional student enrollment of 624, its highest graduate enrollment to date. CAES News
Entrepreneurial Speaker Series
On Jan. 19, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Research will launch a four-part virtual seminar series titled “Start, Sustain, Succeed!” covering topics in agriculture, food and sustainable entrepreneurship.
Examples of a living mulch (top) and cereal rye cover crop terminated prior to planting (bottom). CAES News
Cover Crops, Living Mulches
For most row crop producers in Georgia, corn, cotton and peanut are planted in the spring and harvested in late fall. After harvest, the ground is left relatively bare, with the residue of the harvested crop the only organic material left on the ground. This is where cover crops come in.
Members of the 2021 Class of the Advancing Georgia's Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry program gathered for a graduation ceremony in early November. CAES News
Advancing Leadership
Twenty-five professionals representing agriculture, forestry and allied sectors graduated from the Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry Class of 2019-21 in November.
When implementing grazing management strategies, one of the key tools to success is using temporary fencing technology. This technology is a fantastic advancement that allows us the opportunity to adjust our grazing paddock size multiple times throughout the year based on animal need and number, forage growth and availability. (Photo by Justin Burt) CAES News
Re-establishing Alfalfa
Alfalfa, once a dominant forage in Georgia, is the third-highest crop for economic returns in the United States. Combined with cheap nitrogen prices, difficulty growing the desirable forage crop in Georgia’s challenging climate led to a decline in alfalfa production in the state after its peak in the 1960s.