Menu

Browse Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production Stories - Page 9

579 results found for Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light. CAES News
Unseasonably Hot
Georgia’s vegetable growers need to irrigate more frequently as unseasonably high temperatures are forecast to remain high with little to no rainfall expected. Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, said it is urgent that vegetable producers heed this advice.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Nematode Impact
A recent University of Georgia Cooperative Extension survey of 431 Georgia vegetable fields found that more than 60% contained root-knot nematodes, tiny parasitic worms that feed on roots and destroy plants.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Freezing Onions
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
Andrew Sawyer (right), a longtime Agriculture and Natural Resources agent, will become Georgia’s Southeast District pecan agent on May 1. He is pictured with Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. CAES News
Pecan Expert
The partnership between University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Pecan Commission yielded a new area pecan agent position for the Southeast District this year.
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge. CAES News
UGArden Donations
Food insecurity is an issue among college students that is rarely discussed but all too common. With limited funds or inconsistent income streams, some college students may have to choose between paying rent and buying groceries.
Onion center rot is a devastating disease for Vidalia onion producers in south Georgia. CAES News
Onion Storage
With Georgia’s Vidalia onion harvest approaching, growers must prepare to protect their crops from diseases during storage, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist.
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year. CAES News
Citrus Crop
The citrus greening disease that has devastated Florida’s industry over the past decade is not affecting Georgia production, but growers should still be aware of the potential danger it can bring, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
A year after the devastation of Hurricane Michael, Georgia's pecan farmers are preparing for this year's crop. Pictured are pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Georgia Pecans
The pecan industry in the Southeast U.S. is at a crossroads, and the 2019 season could go a long way toward determining the financial future for many Georgia farmers, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.