Menu

Browse Lawn and Garden Stories - Page 10

908 results found for Lawn and Garden
More Georgia students, like these at City Park Elementary in Dalton, Georgia, are learning science, technology, engineering, art and math by planting and tending school gardens. CAES News
STEAM Studies
School gardens can be an integral part of a school’s STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) curriculum.
Adding mulch to landscape beds can be an effective way to control small weed infestations or in areas where herbicides cannot be used, UGA Extension experts say. CAES News
Weed Killing
Many clients contact their local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office frustrated with grasses taking over their flower beds or vegetable gardens. Here are a few tips to take some of that weed stress away.
On the campus in Griffin, Georgia, UGA blueberry researcher Scott NeSmith typically breeds new varieties to meet growers' needs. Now, he's released some ornamental blueberries that are perfect for growing in home landscapes and will help home gardeners grow their own fresh fruit. CAES News
Ornamental Blueberries
For years, University of Georgia plant breeder Scott NeSmith has created blueberry varieties for the commercial market. Now, he’s introduced a series of blueberry plants bred for home gardeners.
The 'Paulk' variety is UGA's newest muscadine release. CAES News
Muscadine Conference
Producers and those interested in muscadine grape production are invited to the University of Georgia Summer Muscadine Conference on Tuesday, July 9, at the university’s South Milledge Greenhouse Complex on Milledge Avenue in Athens.
Nostoc is a jelly-like substance with multiple common names like star jelly and witch’s butter. In its hydrated, gelatinous, green state, it can be a safety hazard. Slippery when wet, Nostoc dries into a black crust that can prevent stolons from rooting, or “tacking,” into the soil, delaying the growth and spread of turfgrass. CAES News
Nostoc Algae
Recent dry weather encouraged the use, and possible overuse, of irrigation systems. Followed by tropical conditions characterized by heavy rainfall and humidity, there have been reports of a jelly-like substance growing in turf.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
'Skeeter' Season
Mosquito activity this spring has been nearly as erratic as Georgia’s weather. In the wake of the recent rainfall, homeowners should eliminate any standing water left behind, which makes perfect mosquito habitats.
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins. CAES News
Peach Pest
Using horticultural oil sprays as an integrated pest management strategy to control San Jose scale in peach trees can be an effective alternative to chemical applications, and a University of Georgia study finds that the best control comes after trees have been pruned, allowing for lower application rates than previously recommended.
Greenhouse and nursery growers from across the southeastern United States converged in Athens June 12-15 for the inaugural Academy of Crop Production hosted by the UGA Department of Horticulture. Part of the program included the annual Industry Open House at the Trial Gardens at UGA. CAES News
Trial Gardens Open House
Each year the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia hosts a summer open house to show off the season’s best plants. This year they’re working to beat the heat by moving the party from July to June.
Georgia sod producers are scrambling to provide more zoysia this season. The popularity of the grass coupled with the wet growing season has their supplies running low. UGA turfgrass researchers Paul Raymer (left) and Alfredo Martinez (right) are shown inspecting a roll of sod with retired UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Gil Landry. CAES News
Zoysia Shortage
Zoysiagrass is gaining in popularity throughout Georgia. Couple increased popularity with a wet and overcast 2018 growing season and some Georgia sod producers are seeing a decline in their inventory.