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44 results found for Handling and Preparing
The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits. CAES News
Cooking Chicken Safely
Food safety experts have been warning consumers against washing and rinsing raw poultry for many years, citing how the bacteria in poultry juices can spread and cross contaminate other foods, utensils and surfaces. A USDA report shows that many aren't listening.
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens. CAES News
Wheat Outbreaks
Consumers have long been warned against the hazards of eating raw cookie dough. As more cases of foodborne illness are linked to contaminated wheat flour, University of Georgia food safety experts are touting the risk in a louder, more forceful voice, while searching for ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat products.
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers. CAES News
Food Waste
Most Americans buy food knowing that they will likely throw some of it away. And, as incomes rise, so does the amount of food that’s wasted. These are just a few of the findings revealed by a food waste study conducted by University of Georgia economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility. CAES News
Easter Food Safety
Easter is right around the corner, and while this holiday can mean different things to different people, many celebrate it with egg dyeing, Easter egg hunts and family meals. That means food safety needs to be part of these springtime traditions too.
Georgia 4-H Club members Beau Gabriel, from left, Vatavion Faust and Davison Willis make ziti as part of Oglethorpe County 4-H Club's Cooking to Share program with adult volunteer Jane Eason. CAES News
Cooking to Share
They say that the quickest way into someone’s heart is through their stomach. For one group of Georgia 4-H club members, their heartfelt, healthy meals are touching the hearts of their community one family at a time.
To save time, and stress, over the holidays, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts recommend preparing meals ahead and freezing them. Dishes, like this Southern-style dressing, can be cooked in advance and take from the freezer straight into the oven. CAES News
Frozen Holiday Treats
For those who love to prepare meals during the holidays, relieve some of the stress associated with cooking by preparing and freezing holiday treats in advance. Freezing prepared foods allows you the satisfaction of homemade meals with the convenience of store-bought ones.
Raw turkey ready to be cooked. CAES News
Frying Turkeys
Fried turkeys continue to be a popular holiday option in the South, but if they’re cooked wrong, they can result in a burnt bird or an unexpected trip to the emergency room.
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey. CAES News
Cooking A Turkey
Whole roasted turkey is the centerpiece for many holiday meals and gatherings. There are a variety of ways to prepare and present it. Just as important as flavors and textures, however, is food safety when preparing and cooking a turkey.
Based on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia, UGA food engineer Kevin Mis Solval has an 80 percent research and 20 percent Extension appointment. Through the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Mis Solval conducts food process engineering research and helps develop food ingredients for projects at the Food Product Innovation and Commercialization (FoodPIC) Center. CAES News
Food Engineer
Kevin Mis Solval has joined the faculty of the University of Georgia as a food engineer in the Department of Food Science and Technology. Based on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia, Mis Solval will conduct food process engineering research and help develop food ingredients for projects at the Food Product Innovation and Commercialization (FoodPIC) Center.