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UGArden Containers become works of art CAES News
UGArden Containers
Surplus military shipping containers have new life as food storage units at UGArden, thanks to students from the Lamar Dodd School of Art and a few gallons of paint.
Tracey Brigman, clinical assistant professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has been named interim FACS coordinator of food safety and preservation. CAES News
Teaming up to promote food preservation safety
A team of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, led by a faculty member in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, will address consumer questions on food safety and preservation while overseeing the National Center for Home Food Preservation on an interim basis.
UGA Extension staff joined Georgia Grown staff to load boxes of produce into hundreds of waiting cars at the Gwinnett Georgia Grown to Go event on May 27. CAES News
Producing Results
Like the moments before a race begins, dozens of staff with Georgia Grown and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension prepared to load thousands of pounds of fresh fruit and vegetables into hundreds of waiting cars and trucks stretched out in long lines at the Gwinnett Georgia Grown to Go event in Lawrenceville, Georgia, on May 27, even before the 3 p.m. start time.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
Dairy Nutrition
Widespread school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic have raised concerns about students’ lack of access to milk.
Steve Brown (left), executive director of the Peanut Research Foundation, and Jeff Johnson, a retired Birdsong Peanuts executive who serves on the Peanut Innovation Lab’s External Advisory Panel, discuss project proposals as the lab started a new five-year program in 2018. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
Peanut school snacks
Because peanut is nutritious, relatively inexpensive and shelf stable, the nut already is the main component in Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food to help children recover from severe malnutrition and in supplementary foods to prevent malnutrition. Numerous studies show cognitive benefits to people who consume nuts; research currently under way through the Peanut Innovation Lab could directly show that eating peanuts can help children succeed in school.
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s. CAES News
Food Security Summit
For the past decade, demographers have predicted that the world would have to double its food supply by 2050 to feed the growing population.
The former executive director of the United Nations World Food Programme, Ertharin Cousin, talks to a boy in the Central African Republic during her visit in late March 2014. Photo by World Food Prize. Not for reuse. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards
Former Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme Ertharin Cousin has spent her career working to build more robust and sustainable food systems in food insecure countries around the world.
Peanut Innovation Lab Assistant Director Jamie Rhoads demonstrates a small-scale sheller in Malawi in March 2019 while working with the Malawi Agricultural Diversification Activity. Photo by Dave Hoisington CAES News
Malawi agriculture partnership
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut at the University of Georgia partners with the U.S. Agency for International Development in Malawi to help farmers diversify their crops.
Eric Yirenkyi Danquah, founder of the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI), right, maize field with WACCI co-founder Kwame Offei, center, and maize breeder Martin Adjei. CAES News
WACCI
Cassava, taro, cowpea: these are the crops that are going fuel the next phase of the green revolution. Today, African researchers are working to develop improved varieties of traditional African crops to meet local food security challenges.