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Georgia 4-H'er Malavika Balamurali displays the dish she cooked during a virtual session of "Adulting 101," a virtual youth development series for 4-H youth that teaches life skills. CAES News
Adulting 101
Adulting is hard.
Tracey Brigman, clinical assistant professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has been named interim FACS coordinator of food safety and preservation. CAES News
Teaming up to promote food preservation safety
A team of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, led by a faculty member in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, will address consumer questions on food safety and preservation while overseeing the National Center for Home Food Preservation on an interim basis.
Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over. CAES News
Tips for preserving peaches
The first Georgia peach crop of the year is arriving at roadside fruit stands, farm markets and grocery stores. Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over.
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged. CAES News
Freezing fruits and vegetables
Freezing is one of the easiest and most convenient ways to extend the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables.
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing. CAES News
Healthy Homes
As messages about COVID-19 come in from all angles, consumers need clear, direct information on how to keep themselves and their families safe from potential infection. University of Georgia food scientists offer tips on staying healthy and protecting your family.
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. CAES News
Takeout Safer
Buying takeout food is a good choice to lower risks of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey. CAES News
Holiday Leftovers
A focal point of holiday festivities for families every year is to gather around the dinner table and partake of delicious delicacies. But as scrumptious as those goodies are the first time, eating them again can be just as good if they are handled properly.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Freezing Onions
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers. CAES News
Food Waste
Most Americans buy food knowing that they will likely throw some of it away. And, as incomes rise, so does the amount of food that’s wasted. These are just a few of the findings revealed by a food waste study conducted by University of Georgia economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.