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In the spring, crape myrtles add color with flowers. In the fall, they add color with brightly colored leaves. CAES News
Crape Myrtle Care
Southern gardeners love crape myrtles, but many don’t know how to care for them to realize the full, gorgeous blooms they expect in the summer.
By focusing on one fruit or vegetable per year, UGA Extension agents and teachers can make sure students absorb how to successfully grow that crop. Sign up to participate at bit.ly/livinlavidaokra. CAES News
Farm to School Month
October is Farm to School Month and this year’s theme is Livin’ La Vida Okra. Farm to School Month, coordinated by Georgia Organics in partnership with UGA Extension, highlights a different fruit or vegetable each year.
Late summer is the right time to prepare soil for September to October plantings of cool-season crops such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, kale, Swiss chard and Brussels sprouts. CAES News
Winter Garden Prep
The end of summer into early fall tends to be the hottest time of the year in the state of Georgia. Many of us are about tired of laboring in our summer gardens, and the heat, humidity, and disease and insect pressure have certainly taken their toll on our summer crops. However, for those of us who still have the gardening itch, the last weeks of summer are the ideal time to prepare your garden for winter vegetables.
Tomato lovers will attest that homegrown always tastes best, even if they don't always win beauty contests. CAES News
Summer Tomatoes
During the summer growing season, the love many have for a homegrown tomato approaches obsession. In fact, some people love tomatoes so much that they struggle to grow them — because they give their plants too much care.
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table. CAES News
Spring Vegetable Gardening
To call this past spring in Georgia normal would be a mischaracterization. Typical springs in Georgia seem to last about three days — and then we hit the hot weather. This spring, the cooler temperatures were most pleasant and hung on through the middle of May. Rainfall has also been feast or famine, and wind patterns have been higher than normal. Together, these conditions have made for a challenging time in the vegetable garden.
Seeds for cultivars like ‘Mr. Lovell’s Wintergreens’ that have been passed down for generations in the north Georgia mountains will now be stored in refrigeration at the UGA Mountain Research and Education Center. (photo contributed by UNG) CAES News
Appalachian Seed Saving
Gold may be rare in the north Georgia mountains, but now the region boasts a seed bank that might be worth just as much to Appalachian natives and local gardening enthusiasts.
Squash plants grow in the UGA Research and Education Garden. CAES News
Vegetable Gardening
While adults and children spend more time at home as a result of the COVID-19 crisis, planting a garden or container garden is a great activity to plan together. It’s outside, active, educational and edible. With some grocery stores taking longer than usual to stock some items, vegetable gardening is a great way to keep your refrigerator stocked.
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table. CAES News
Farming Workshop
A small farm workshop is set for Tuesday, Feb. 4, from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia.
Tomato lovers will attest that homegrown always tastes best, even if they don't always win beauty contests. CAES News
Ugly "Maters"
There are several tomato disorders that cause a variety of deformities in tomatoes. Most of these disorders are caused by environmental stresses, insects or certain plant diseases.