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Whether you are searching for pelleted seed, unique vegetables or hard-to-find flowers, seed catalogs are full of every kind of seed a gardener could imagine. CAES News
Garden Seed
Seed catalogs introduce gardeners to new or different plants that they may not be able to find as seedlings at local garden centers. The information in catalogs can be a bit overwhelming to novice gardeners, so it is important to know how to interpret some of the technical information and abbreviations, much like learning the language of gardeners.
Pictured are pumpkins growing on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2014. CAES News
Growing Pumpkins
High temperatures, humid nights and disease pressure make growing pumpkins difficult for south Georgia farmers, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
UGA Organic Class composting pile. CAES News
Disease Control
Good sanitation in the garden this fall will reduce disease problems next spring. Many disease-causing organisms can survive the winter in diseased plant debris. Reducing or eliminating these potential overwintering sites for pathogenic fungi, bacteria, nematodes and viruses will cut down on the occurrence of disease problems the following season.
The most common species of fruit fly has red/orange eyes, but not all fruit flies have red/orange eyes. Fruit flies, typically just an eighth of an inch in size, often hover around and just above food (most often decomposing vegetable matter) prior to landing.

Habits: Feed mainly on decaying vegetable matter, compost, rotting fruit, etc. Often found around salad bars and restaurants where vegetable matter and juices collect. Also called vinegar flies, since vinegar (acetic acid) is a decomposition product of some rotting vegetable matter.

Interventions: Find larval fly feeding site(s) and clean or otherwise throw away rotting fruit or vegetable matter. Remove garbage, including the plastic liner, and other refuse at least twice per week.

Might Be Confused With: humpbacked flies, fungus gnats, moth flies. CAES News
Fruit Flies
Fruit flies can be a problem year-round, but are especially common during late summer and fall because they are attracted to ripe or fermenting fruits and vegetables. The best way to avoid problems with fruit flies is to eliminate sources of attraction.
Pie pumpkin painted during workshop at UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Preserving Pumpkins
Pumpkins are a staple of fall-time cuisine and festivities. Whether canned, dried or pickled, there are some important tips to keep in mind when preserving this holiday favorite. Due to natural acidity levels, pumpkins require certain precautions be taken when canning in order to make preserves that are safe to eat.
A garden hoe lies in a pile of fresh compost. CAES News
Compost Workshops
Food Well Alliance, in collaboration with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and other organizations, designed the Healthy Soil, Healthy Community Initiative to help Atlanta’s community gardens adopt better composting practices to improve metro Atlanta’s soil.
The National Center for Home Food Preservation has distributed 1,300 copies of the "Put it Up! Food Preservation for Youth" curriculum since it was launched in 2014. CAES News
Put it Up!
With more and more students growing their own produce through community and school gardens, it only makes sense that many students are ready to take the next step and “put up” some of those hard-earned veggies and fruits.
A pair of sunburnt watermelons sit in a field in Tift County. CAES News
Georgia Watermelons
High summer temperatures and intense sun could reduce Georgia's end-of-season watermelon production this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Tim Coolong. Because of the increased heat over the past week, risk of sunburn for watermelons in the field has been high. If watermelons do scald, they may not be marketable, which may reduce farmers’ normal timeframe for selling their crop.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Vidalia Onion Crop
Heavy rainfall and high winds contributed to Georgia farmers growing fewer Vidalia onions this year, but demand for the popular vegetable and low yields for Texas onions helped keep prices steady.