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160 results found for Vegetables
Photos of seeds available at a recent seed swap at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. CAES News
Heirlooms at Rock Eagle
here’s nothing quite as satisfying as harvesting a juicy, vibrant watermelon or perfectly-ripened tomato from your garden. For anyone who has a green thumb, May’s Saturday at the Rock session is for you. Set aside Saturday, May 21, to learn about seed-saving and the benefits of heirloom plants in your garden.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness CAES News
Tomato Growing Tips
Whether or not you are trying to grow tomatoes for the first time, or if your a vegetable garden veteran, following some tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is sure to make your harvest plentiful.
Fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2-feet high and the bottom must be buried at least 3-inches deep. CAES News
Rabbit Control
While rabbits may seem cute and fuzzy, the common rabbit or eastern cottontail can do considerable damage to flowers, vegetables, trees and shrubs any time of the year in places ranging from suburban yards to rural fields and tree plantations.
Squash vine borer larvae hatch and eat their way into the plant's stem near the soil level. Since the pests are hidden inside the plant, most home gardeners have no idea that pests are present until the plants wither and die. A healthy squash plant (left) is shown in a Spalding County, Georgia, garden next to a plant infected with squash vine borers. CAES News
Winter and Summer Squash
To most Southern gardeners, fried yellow squash or grilled zucchini are staples on the table during the summer. Serving up homegrown winter squash in the fall is worthy of bragging rights. While normally easy to grow, the endless choice of varieties and numerous garden pests have made growing squash a little more challenging.
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Squash Planting
Squash varieties come in unique shapes and colors. Pattypan is a yellow squash that’s shaped like a star or scallop, while eight-ball is a dark squash that looks like a Magic 8 Ball toy. Summer squash come in straightneck, crookneck, striped, light green, dark green and every shade of yellow. Winter squash come in very different shapes and the traditional favorites include butternut, acorn and buttercup.
Floyd County UGA Master Gardener Extension Volunteers stand with a "This Garden is Served by UGA Cooperative Extension" sign posted at community garden in Rome, Georgia. CAES News
Community and School Gardens
In early 2016, UGA Cooperative Extension Agents report they are working with over 550 community and school gardens across Georgia and this number will increase.
Members of Stanley Culpepper's team conducts a trial that is comparing methyl bromide to Paladin Pic, Trifecta, and the UGA 3-WAY. CAES News
Drift Complaints
Complaints over off-target movement of chemical applications went down 48 percent from 2014 to 2015, but Georgia farmers must better understand the factors that influence drift, according to University of Georgia weed scientist Stanley Culpepper.
Pictured is David Riley, entomologist on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Award Winner
David Riley’s work on the effects of cowpea curculio and other insects on vegetables has earned him the 2016 Recognition Award in Entomology from the Southeastern Branch of the Entomological Society of America.