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Yard bird art adorns a theme garden at the Georgia Research and Education Garden on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Curb Appeal
Whether driving in our own neighborhood or going to visit friends or relatives, we all tend to compare our home landscape to others. There’s no denying that a well-landscaped house is very appealing to the eye and can make a home more inviting.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Mosquito Season
With warmer temperatures around the corner, Georgia’s mosquito season won’t be far behind. This year the remote chance of a southeastern U.S. outbreak of Zika — a mosquito-borne virus now prevalent in parts of South America — has university and public health officials doubling down on their message of how to control the pest.
CAES horticulture professor Tim Smalley leads his students on a walking plant ID tour on the UGA campus in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Tim Smalley Honored
Tim Smalley, associate professor of horticulture in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named a Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professors, the university’s highest recognition for excellence in instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
Katharine Rose Hall, a senior studying communication sciences and disorders in the UGA College of Education, juxtaposed the crown of a North Campus Ginkgo tree with one of the UGA Holmes-Hunter Academic Building's Corinthian columns in her first place photo. CAES News
UGA Campus Arboretum
The University of Georgia Campus Arboretum Initiative, sponsored by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Department of Horticulture, has announced the winners of its 2015 Memorable UGA Campus Trees and Shrubs Photo Competition.
A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Springlike weather throughout the state cause ornamental shrubs and trees to bloom early. These azaleas blossomed the week before Christmas in Hart County. CAES News
Pruning Patience
With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged some of these early signs of life. But there’s still hope for those way-too-early bloomers. The key is to be patient and wait to see what happens.
In "Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast," Susan Varlamoff pulls together science-based information from Southern land-grant universities on various aspects of environmentally friendly gardening. CAES News
Sustainable Gardening Book
In her new book, “Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast,” Susan Varlamoff, CAES director of the Office of Environmental Sciences, aims to provide home gardeners with comprehensive information on environmentally friendly gardening and to teach readers how to create an ecosystem in home landscapes.
Christmas plants, like these Christmas cacti and Norfolk Island pine, can make the perfect gift for the green thumbs on your holiday list. CAES News
Living Christmas Trees
Container-grown or balled-and-burlapped Christmas trees can be planted as landscape trees after the holidays. This way of enjoying a Christmas tree is practical in Georgia, where the mild December or early January weather is ideal for tree planting. With care and planning, your Christmas tree will serve as a living memory for many years.
Mushrooms typically pop up after a period of rainfall. University of Georgia plant pathologists say identifying the ones that are edible is hard, even for trained experts. Eating a poisonous mushrooms can lead to intestinal discomfort, cause damage to vital organs and even lead to death. CAES News
Toxic Mushrooms
To give an accurate identification of a mushroom, University of Georgia plant pathologist Jean Williams-Woodward needs to examine a sample in her laboratory. Identifying mushrooms is not an easy task, and incorrectly identifying one can lead to deadly results.