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228 results found for Landscaping
A Georgia Master Gardener trims a shrub in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
New Year, New Landscape
A new year brings new opportunities. If one of your resolutions was to improve your lawn and garden, you may need to know where to start and what you can do in the winter.
Springlike weather throughout the state cause ornamental shrubs and trees to bloom early. These azaleas blossomed the week before Christmas in Hart County. CAES News
Pruning Patience
With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged some of these early signs of life. But there’s still hope for those way-too-early bloomers. The key is to be patient and wait to see what happens.
In "Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast," Susan Varlamoff pulls together science-based information from Southern land-grant universities on various aspects of environmentally friendly gardening. CAES News
Sustainable Gardening Book
In her new book, “Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast,” Susan Varlamoff, CAES director of the Office of Environmental Sciences, aims to provide home gardeners with comprehensive information on environmentally friendly gardening and to teach readers how to create an ecosystem in home landscapes.
Christmas plants, like these Christmas cacti and Norfolk Island pine, can make the perfect gift for the green thumbs on your holiday list. CAES News
Living Christmas Trees
Container-grown or balled-and-burlapped Christmas trees can be planted as landscape trees after the holidays. This way of enjoying a Christmas tree is practical in Georgia, where the mild December or early January weather is ideal for tree planting. With care and planning, your Christmas tree will serve as a living memory for many years.
Mushrooms typically pop up after a period of rainfall. University of Georgia plant pathologists say identifying the ones that are edible is hard, even for trained experts. Eating a poisonous mushrooms can lead to intestinal discomfort, cause damage to vital organs and even lead to death. CAES News
Toxic Mushrooms
To give an accurate identification of a mushroom, University of Georgia plant pathologist Jean Williams-Woodward needs to examine a sample in her laboratory. Identifying mushrooms is not an easy task, and incorrectly identifying one can lead to deadly results.
Conks, fibrous but sometimes fleshy fruiting bodies of a wood-rotting fungus, grow on a tree CAES News
Tree Decay
Wood-rotting organisms can slowly nibble away at tree trunks and buttress roots. Many trees that topple look perfectly healthy before they fall. Afterward, it becomes clear that there were absolutely no structural roots remaining for support.
Begonia Baby Wing® 'Bicolor' – PanAmerican Seed CAES News
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of the best of those plants become Classic City Award winners.
Oak leaf blister (Taphrina caerulescens). www.ipmimages.org CAES News
Oak Leaf Blister
Most fungal pathogens that infect leaves prefer cool, moist conditions during leaf expansion in early spring. The leaf spot disease seen most often on oak trees this year is caused by a fungus known as Taphrina caerulescens, or oak leaf blister.
Root suckers pop up as a result of a tree being injured or stressed as was the case with this Bradford pear tree. CAES News
Root Suckers
Root suckers, or root sprouts, are a tree’s natural response to wounding or stress. Therefore, the best way to prevent them is to minimize or avoid causing wounds or stress to trees.