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231 results found for Landscaping
Begonia Baby Wing® 'Bicolor' – PanAmerican Seed CAES News
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of the best of those plants become Classic City Award winners.
Oak leaf blister (Taphrina caerulescens). www.ipmimages.org CAES News
Oak Leaf Blister
Most fungal pathogens that infect leaves prefer cool, moist conditions during leaf expansion in early spring. The leaf spot disease seen most often on oak trees this year is caused by a fungus known as Taphrina caerulescens, or oak leaf blister.
Root suckers pop up as a result of a tree being injured or stressed as was the case with this Bradford pear tree. CAES News
Root Suckers
Root suckers, or root sprouts, are a tree’s natural response to wounding or stress. Therefore, the best way to prevent them is to minimize or avoid causing wounds or stress to trees.
Most Georgians have fond childhood memories of honeysuckle vines, but the species of the fragrant vine that is most common is actually an invasive. CAES News
Invasive Flowers
If you’ve driven down the road alongside an overgrown fence or forested area in north Georgia lately, you were likely overwhelmed with a combination of fragrance from wild Japanese honeysuckle and Chinese privet. Many people assume they are native because they are so common, but neither one belongs on this continent. Both originated in Asia and were introduced to North America in the 1800s for ornamental uses in landscaping.
A push mower used to mow turfgrass. CAES News
Lawn Thatch
Thatch is a layer of living and dead roots, crowns and lower shoots that often develops in lawns. It can weaken and even destroy a lawn if not prevented or removed.
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise. CAES News
Pollinator Protection
There are more than 4,000 species of native bees in North America — from plump, stalwart carpenter bees to the hardworking blueberry bees that help pollinate the state’s top fruit crop.
Sawfly damage on roses CAES News
Rose Sawflies
Dozens of calls and samples of roses with a variety of leaf problems are coming into the University of Georgia Extension office in Bartow County. The most common problem diagnosed this year is injury caused by rose sawflies, also known as rose slugs.
Celosia is one of many flowering plants that attracts beneficial pollinating insects. Other flowering plants that attract beneficial insects include aster, butterfly weed, coneflower, cosmos, rudbeckia, sunflower and zinnias. CAES News
Eco-friendly Garden
An eco-friendly container garden class has been set for Friday, May 15 at the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden, off of Ellis Road in Griffin, Georgia.
Phenoxy herbicide damage to a willow oak tree. CAES News
Herbicide Labels
An herbicide designed to kill weeds in turfgrass can also kill neighboring trees and shrubs.