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Deer are beautiful creatures, but seeing them dining on your landscape plants quickly makes their beauty fade. CAES News
Plant Destroyers
As counties across Georgia continue to develop, wildlife habitats are disturbed and destroyed. This drives deer, and other wildlife, into home landscapes, where they feast on plants. Deterring them can be a challenge.
Mixed containers featuring trailing pansies and dianthus make this Old Town patio in Columbus, Georgia, a cool season delight. CAES News
Pansy Partners
Trailing foliage and flowers are equally paramount to designing mixed baskets and containers in the cool season. Throughout the Old Town community in Columbus, Georgia, container gardens make colorful statements.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Watering Rules
Fall is typically when homeowners make changes to their landscapes, like adding new plants and trees. Some 110 Georgia counties are suffering from drought conditions, but both Level 1 and 2 drought response allow for irrigation of personal food gardens at any time of day, and new and replanted plants, seeds and turfgrass can be watered for 30 days after installation.
The 'Hana Jiman' camellia looks as though it were hand-painted by an artist. CAES News
Fall Camellias
Mention fall-blooming camellias and the first thought is most likely the sasanqua camellia. There are many camellia varieties and each has the ability to provide the bones or evergreen structure needed in the home landscape.
Calibrachoa 'Cabaret® Lemon Yellow' was a crowd favorite at the public open house before being selected as a Classic City Garden Award winner. It was quick to grow into a mound of deep green foliage that became covered in deep lemon-yellow flowers. This plant remained in full bloom all summer. CAES News
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of those plants become Classic City Garden Award winners.
Zinnias are great plants for pollinators like these Gulf Fritillary butterflies.jpg CAES News
Floral Beauty
After a hurricane, you find beauty and pleasure in simple things. In my case, it is the old-fashioned zinnia. Now I say “old-fashioned” because we grew them from generic seed packets, so I don’t know the variety. I would say it is the zinnia you grew up with as a kid.
University of Georgia horticulturist Carol Robacker has released 'Raspberry Profusion,' a cultivar that blooms heavily from May to September. Its raspberry-colored sepals, wonderful fragrance and foliage is more spectacular than older varieties. CAES News
Foundation Plants
What makes a good foundation plant for your home landscape? Any plant that can tolerate extreme heat, highly compact soil and a highly alkaline soil pH is a good candidate.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
A monarch butterfly finds the palmleaf mistflower to be a tasty treat. CAES News
Butterfly Attractor
When I moved into my new house about this time last year, I was quick to notice my neighbor’s flowers across the street. I could see drifts of wonderful, tall, blue flowers coupled with the complementary orange of swirling Gulf fritillary butterflies. I knew immediately that my neighbor was a real gardener, as those showy blooms could be identified as the native blue mistflower known botanically as Conoclinium coelestinum.