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20 results found for Greens
Lettuce, a high-value cash crop, was among the highest yielding crops in a University of Georgia organic trial incorporating cover crops into a high-intensive crop rotation model at a UGA farm in Watkinsville, GA. The crop yielded a net return of over $9,000 per acre over the three-year study period. CAES News
Cover crops + organics
Organic vegetable farmers in the Southeast now have a successful model for planting summer cover crops with high-value, cool-season crops, thanks to a University of Georgia study. The two models use a series of crop rotations to increase yields, control insects and diseases, improve crop quality and build soil biomass.
University of Georgia scientists on the Griffin campus are studying ways to plan fall vegetables directly into turfgrass lawns. The researchers hope to find a way to help suburbanites plant vegetables gardens and enjoy their lawns. CAES News
Lawn Gardens
A team of University of Georgia researchers is studying the use of home lawns as garden plots. If successful, suburbanites with warm-season lawns could plant fall vegetables on top of their turfgrass lawns.
Judy Harrison, UGA Extension food safety specialist, with the project she helped create: "Enhancing the Safety of Locally Grown Produce." CAES News
Food Safety Project

Shoppers expect food from local farmers markets to be healthier and safer than comparable items in the grocery store. A group of Southern university scientists are training farmers and market managers to help make that assumption a reality.

Collard greens grow in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Fall Vegetables
As summer vegetables like corn and beans stop bearing, home gardeners can plant fall gardens filled with cool-season vegetables.
Squash vine borer larva inside squash vine. CAES News
Modified Organics
To place the certified organic seal on their produce, farmers must follow a strict list of rules. Home gardeners who want to use organic practices can take the first steps by using methods one University of Georgia expert calls “modified organics.”
A grower sells fresh cut flowers at a farmers market in Henry County. CAES News
Small Farmer Workshop
UGA Extension will present a workshop for would-be small farmers on March 14 on the Central Georgia Technical College campus in Milledgeville.
Corn tassels stretch toward the sun in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Garden rows
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, I answer hundreds of gardening question. This week, a gardener wanted to know how far apart to space her garden rows. The short answer is: it depends.
Farmers and members of the general public met in Macon on March 20 to view a listening session in Atlanta on the proposed new food safety act. Lee Lancaster, senior compliance specialist with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, is shown explaining how to submit comments to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. CAES News
Food safety act
Concerned Georgia farmers gathered in Atlanta, Macon and Tifton on Wednesday, March 20 to hear a summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s new Food Safety Modernization Act. Proposed by Congress, the act was developed in an effort to improve the safety of the nation’s food supply.
Collard greens grow in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Spotted greens
Growing and eating collards, turnips and other greens are a Southern tradition. But home gardeners often complain of spots on the leaves of homegrown greens.