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Did you know that University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has a library of information on how to prepare for and recover from natural disasters and household emergencies? From packing an emergency preparedness kit to rehabbing a water logged landscape, Georgians can find the emergency information they need by visiting extension.uga.edu/topic-areas/timely-topics/emergencies.html . CAES News
Did you know that University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has a library of information on how to prepare for and recover from natural disasters and household emergencies? From packing an emergency preparedness kit to rehabbing a water logged landscape, Georgians can find the emergency information they need by visiting extension.uga.edu/topic-areas/timely-topics/emergencies.html .
Tropical Warnings
Longtime residents of Georgia may remember the devastating floods of Tropical Storm Alberto in July 1994. The rain was so intense that Georgia’s one-day rainfall record was set during that storm: 21.10 inches of rain was recorded in Americus, Georgia, over a 24-hour period ending on July 6, 1994, as the storm stalled over the state. Despite that incredible record and the resulting damage, the National Hurricane Center did not retire that storm’s name. “Alberto” is the first on the list of Atlantic tropical storm names for the 2018 season, which begins on June 1.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
Peanut Planting Time
Now is the peak time to plant peanuts in Georgia, according to Cristiane Pilon, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut physiologist.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say removing your shoes before going indoors can reduce the amount of pollen you track into your home. Other ways to reduce the amount of pollen indoors include wiping your pets' paws before allowing them to come inside and cleaning floors and surfaces often. CAES News
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say removing your shoes before going indoors can reduce the amount of pollen you track into your home. Other ways to reduce the amount of pollen indoors include wiping your pets' paws before allowing them to come inside and cleaning floors and surfaces often.
Indoor Pollen
Are your sinuses clogged? Do you feel like you are walking in a sea of yellow dust? Have you washed your car three times this week? Welcome to pollen season in Georgia.
Temperatures in April were about 2 to 4 degrees below normal across the state. CAES News
Temperatures in April were about 2 to 4 degrees below normal across the state.
Cool Spring
Going into the start of the growing season, a wetter, cooler-than-normal April helped to reduce drought conditions across the northern three-quarters of Georgia, but drought conditions remain in the southeastern corner of the state.
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo. CAES News
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo.
Planting Conditions
Georgia farmers should expect dry weather when they plant their crops this spring, but Pam Knox, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences agricultural climatologist, anticipates an active tropical storm season in the Atlantic Ocean this summer.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees.
Agroforestry & Wildlife
Pine straw production, timber sales and wildlife management will top the list of topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day slated for Thursday, Sept. 20, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
When yards are flooded, residential well safety is of paramount importance. Cities and counties alert citizens with boil advisories when municipal water supplies are affected, but those who rely on wells for water have to monitor their water themselves. Wells that have been overtopped by flood waters need to flushed and tested for bacteria because of the potential danger of contaminants being washed into the well. CAES News
When yards are flooded, residential well safety is of paramount importance. Cities and counties alert citizens with boil advisories when municipal water supplies are affected, but those who rely on wells for water have to monitor their water themselves. Wells that have been overtopped by flood waters need to flushed and tested for bacteria because of the potential danger of contaminants being washed into the well.
'Funny' Water
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents often get calls from homeowners who are concerned about the quality of their well water. Water from municipal sources is routinely monitored for safety, but water from private wells isn’t.
Water runs from a silver faucet. CAES News
Water runs from a silver faucet.
Water Conservation
The average American uses between 80 and 100 gallons of water a day, and that may not seem like much, but over the course of a year, or a lifetime, it adds up. With only 1 percent of the world’s water suitable for drinking or growing crops, it’s up to everyone to the do their part to conserve this finite resource.
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia. CAES News
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia.
Native Azaleas
Georgians are accustomed to evergreen azaleas, but native azaleas are currently growing in popularity. Unlike evergreen azaleas, native azaleas lose their leaves in the fall, grow tall and airy rather than low and dense, and bloom in the spring and summer.
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Water Summits
Water summits in Tifton, Georgia, this week and across the U.S. provide fruit and vegetable growers with an opportunity to discuss water use on farms and simplification of existing water regulation standards with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials.