Menu

Browse Environment Stories - Page 3

657 results found for Environment
darold batzer 34355 002 1140x760 CAES News
Freshwater Ecology
Of all the elements that make a stream community, there is one, besides the water, that is particularly crucial to the health of the ecosystem. It’s the bugs. Tiny but mighty, aquatic insects are responsible for many vital ecosystem processes that support fish, birds and humans.
Griffin Campus Jack Huang Resized CAES News
Improved PFAS Treatments
University of Georgia researchers in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the College of Engineering are wrapping up the final year of a study to develop improved, cost-effective treatment systems with advanced technologies for removing polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances from water, wastewater and biosolids. The team was awarded nearly $1.6 million through a congressionally mandated grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to mitigate PFAS.
The big player in the weather the rest of this growing season and next winter is the rapidly developing El Niño. The statistics and longest-range climate models suggest that by November we could see typical rainy El Niño conditions occurring over southern Georgia and Alabama down into Florida as well as up the East Coast. CAES News
Climate Outlook
While we had an early start to the growing season, it was followed by colder conditions in March that slowed things down quite a bit. Since that time, we have seen periods of very warm weather alternating with much cooler conditions. As soil temperatures rise and fall, it has been tough for farmers to know when to plant. The big player in the weather the rest of this growing season and next winter is the rapidly developing El Niño.
Pollinator Plants of the Year CAES News
Pollinator Plants
With so many options available, it can be challenging to know what plants to add to your home garden that will look beautiful and help the environment. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the State Botanical Garden of Georgia are helping gardeners by selecting four Georgia Pollinator Plants of the Year.
iStock 171572061 (1) CAES News
Bees in winter
As temperatures continue to drop and many pollinators fade from view, you may be wondering what happens to bees during the cold season. Do they hibernate? Are they hiding in plain sight? How a bee spends the winter depends on the species of bee, but the insects have an arsenal of strategies to survive the chill, including burrowing, gathering in tight clusters, or hiding in flower stems or leaf piles.
Newly purchased sensors will allow growers to monitor fertilizer movements in their soil over time and adjust irrigation and other production practices to minimize fertilizer loss through leaching. CAES News
Irrigation Scheduling Technology
Over the last few decades, water use-related disagreements between Georgia and its surrounding states have held the spotlight in the Southeast. To address the need for conservation, the Agricultural Water Efficiency Team (AgWET) was created to train University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents to transfer advanced irrigation scheduling knowledge to growers through a unique one-on-one educational approach.
Most of the time, covers are used to reduce frost damage, while freeze damage depends on the plant species. CAES News
Cold Protection Options
Whether you’re a home gardener or a production farmer, Georgia’s mild climate allows for a variety of fruits and vegetables to be grown throughout the year. However, with erratic weather events and broad temperature swings during the winter and early spring months, having a few cold protection resources on hand can help you weather the unpredictability.
Apples grow at the Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Georgia. In Elijay, the “Apple Capital of Georgia,” orchards accumulated more than 700 chilling hours between Oct. 1 and Dec. 30, 2022. (Photo by John Amis) CAES News
Effects of Cold
With an October freeze followed by a relatively balmy December capped with several consecutive days of subfreezing temperatures, Georgia weather has experienced a few unexpected weather events from autumn into winter. Temperatures at both ends of the spectrum can affect the development of fruit crops during the dormant season, including blueberries and peaches, which are economically important crops in Georgia.
Honeybee Control and Removal certification training is underway. A class held at UGA-Griffin by Extension entomologist Dan Suiter covered state and federal laws, honeybee identification, removal techniques and more. CAES News
Honeybee Control and Removal
When a swarm of honeybees takes up residence in your house, you may not know who to call to help safely relocate the pollinators and preserve your home in the process. Thanks to a new certification program through the Georgia Department of Agriculture called Honeybee Control and Removal, it will be easier for residents to locate licensed professionals to handle the job.