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405 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo.
Pesticide Drift
No official pesticide drift complaints have been reported to the Georgia Department of Agriculture this year due to in-season applications of dicamba, or 2,4-D.
In the foreground of the peanut field, crown rot leaves considerable damage, compared to a good stand of peanuts with clean seed. CAES News
In the foreground of the peanut field, crown rot leaves considerable damage, compared to a good stand of peanuts with clean seed.
Aspergillus Crown Rot
Aspergillus crown rot disease is on the rise in Georgia peanut fields and University of Georgia researchers are working to pinpoint why. At present, university scientists recommend that farmers encountering this problem in their fields stop saving seed from year to year in an effort to reduce the disease while better control methods are found. The first line of defense has been fungicide application either in furrow or directly to the seed.
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. Blueberry farmers are wary of a late season freeze and its impact on this year's crop. CAES News
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. Blueberry farmers are wary of a late season freeze and its impact on this year's crop.
Blueberry Production
Nematode control is one of the costliest hurdles to blueberry production on replanted sites. Through research trials in Appling County, Georgia, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Shane Curry found that adding pine bark mulch when replanting blueberry fields helps to combat the pests.
Cucurbit leaf crumple virus, a disease carried by whiteflies, infects vegetable plants like squash (pictured). CAES News
Cucurbit leaf crumple virus, a disease carried by whiteflies, infects vegetable plants like squash (pictured).
Whitefly management
Summer may have ended, but Georgia’s silverleaf whitefly infestation has not.
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons.
Controlling Fire Ants
Fall is perfect for playing football, picking pumpkins and killing fire ants. Tackling the stinging pests now will cut down on the number you encounter next spring and summer, according to entomologists with the University of Georgia.
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Watermelons sit in a truck after being harvested on the UGA Tifton campus.
Watermelon Crop
Georgia farmers had fewer opportunities to effectively harvest watermelons in June thanks to an increase in rain, but disease pressure is what truly led to lower yields in the crop this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong.
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whiteflies
Populations of whiteflies are “unusually high” in Georgia cotton fields this season, making early detection and management of whiteflies essential, according to University of Georgia entomologists Phillip Roberts and Stormy Sparks.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia.
Vegetable Nematologist
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest plant pathologist will focus on improved control of plant-parasitic nematodes, the microscopic, worm-like pests that primarily feed on the roots of Georgia’s vegetable crops.
Since about half of Georgia's peanuts are produced on dry land, or land without access to irrigation, growers rely on rain to produce a good crop. CAES News
Since about half of Georgia's peanuts are produced on dry land, or land without access to irrigation, growers rely on rain to produce a good crop.
Burrower Bug
Through part of a $12.1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney is studying the biology of the burrower bug and developing an effective management program.
Jonathan Oliver recently joined the college as a fruit pathologist specializing in blueberries, blackberries, citrus, pomegranates, olives and mayhaws. CAES News
Jonathan Oliver recently joined the college as a fruit pathologist specializing in blueberries, blackberries, citrus, pomegranates, olives and mayhaws.
New Fruit Pathologist
Jonathan Oliver’s study of blueberries and his homegrown knowledge of citrus makes the Palatka, Florida, native a valuable addition to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.