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Browse Weeds, Diseases and Pests Stories - Page 6

462 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Pecan scab fungus (Fusicladium effusum) is the most destructive disease of pecans in Georgia. CAES News
Fighting Pecan Scab
University of Georgia researchers will begin a series of trials this winter to help identify better management practices for pecan growers in Georgia.
Smith posing with a bird and a research sample. CAES News
UGA entomology fellow Olivia Smith
Following the onset of several major outbreaks of foodborne pathogens traced back to wildlife, buyers of farm-fresh produce began encouraging the removal of natural habitats and nesting areas on farms to discourage wildlife intrusion.
"Skippy stands" have been more prevalent this summer, which may increase the incidence of tomato spotted wilt virus infection. (Photo by Phillip Edwards, Irwin County) CAES News
TSWV Control
Come August, the state's peanut growers will either see the payoff of their spring efforts to control for tomato spotted wilt virus, or they will be planning ways to preventatively manage this persistent virus with recommendations from University of Georgia scientists.
Test plots at the the J. Phil Campbell Research Farm located near Watkinsville, Georgia, show (from left) cereal rye, no cover crop, living white clover mulch and crimson clover approximately three weeks after cotton planting. Areas in red indicate where Palmer amaranth seed was planted and will be monitored for suppression and reproduction over the next several years. CAES News
Getting it covered
University of Georgia researchers are working on natural solutions to weed problems in row crops as government regulations of chemical herbicides grow stricter.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Mosquito Control
It officially turned summer this past weekend and the weather forecast seems to agree, with thunderstorms and warm nights in our future. These conditions are pretty typical for summer in Georgia — and excellent for mosquito development.
Subterranean termite swarmers are most commonly seen in spring and are a telltale sign of termite infestation. (Photo by Brian Forschler) CAES News
Home Termites
Border to border, the state of Georgia enjoys mild temperatures and more than adequate rainfall, which are perfect conditions for the growth of an abundance of insects, including subterranean termites.
Pictured is a pecan affected by scab disease. CAES News
Pecan Scab
To protect against scab disease resistance, Georgia pecan farmers now have a new fungicide in their arsenal, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia Beetles
Research entomologists in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are using three grants to study ambrosia beetles in an effort to prevent future attacks and preserve more fruit and nut trees.
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia. CAES News
Blueberry Disease
A plant pathologist at the University of Georgia Tifton campus is using a grant from the Georgia Farm Bureau to study a bacterial disease that is harming the state’s blueberry crops.