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Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. CAES News
Cotton Update
End-of-year rainfall and poor harvest conditions have been tough on Georgia’s cotton crop and tested Georgia’s cotton farmers, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s new cotton agronomist.
The 2016 Ag Forecast sessions will be held on Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Carroll County Ag Center in Carrollton; Friday, Jan. 22, at Unicoi State Park in Cleveland; Monday, Jan. 25, at the Cloud Livestock Facility in Bainbridge; Tuesday, Jan. 26, at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton; Wednesday, Jan. 27, at the Blueberry Warehouse in Alma; and Friday, Jan. 29, at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building in Macon. CAES News
Ag Forecast 2016
Good information is the best defense against the unforeseen circumstances — like changing governmental regulations and weather patterns — that can impact agriculture. That’s why the University of Georgia’s team of agricultural economists kicks off each year with the Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series. There, they present valuable insights into what the upcoming year will hold for the state's largest industry.
Jerry Johnson, a University of Georgia professor of crop and soil sciences, has developed or co-developed a total of 44 new small grain crop varieties, including several wheat and barley cultivars. He was recently named UGA's 2015 Inventor of the Year. CAES News
Inventor of the Year
As a young man working on his family’s farm in Perry, Georgia, Jerry Johnson loved the sight of wheat growing in the fields. Decades later, Johnson, now a respected plant breeder and crop and soil sciences professor, received the 2015 Inventor’s Award from the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF) for his work breeding wheat varieties for farmers in Georgia and across the Southeast.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Crop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells fears Georgia’s pecan crop will fail to meet initial production projections by as much as 20 million pounds.
U.S. currency and credit cards. CAES News
Spend Smart
The holiday shopping season starts earlier every year. Competition from online businesses is forcing brick-and-mortar retailers to open earlier and earlier. Long before Thanksgiving dinner has been reduced to leftovers, shoppers will be looking for bargains. With a little forethought, even procrastinators can benefit from these shopping tips.
CAES News
Gift Cards
Gift cards make great gifts, but it’s important to make sure gift givers understand the disclosures that come with the card. Otherwise, they could end up giving retailers the unintended gift of free cash.
UGA Extension has researched-based resources for those who want to raise backyard chickens. CAES News
Avian Influenza
The current highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 outbreak in the United States is a concern for the commercial poultry industry, not the general population, says a University of Georgia poultry expert. Humans won’t be infected with avian influenza by eating chicken or other poultry products. Nearly all previous cases of human infections with other avian influenza viruses involved close, direct contact with infected poultry, but little to no direct transmission from person to person. While the HPAI H5 virus has caused some severe devastation for the U.S. commercial poultry industry, there have been no reports of infections in humans, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from this virus to be low.
Flavor of Georgia logo CAES News
Flavor of Georgia 2016
Whether it’s a specialty sweet treat, small-batch pork sausage or pimento cheese made from Grandma’s secret recipe, the University of Georgia’s Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest shines the spotlight on the state’s craft foods. Registration for the 2016 Flavor of Georgia contest, which is conducted each year by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, is now open.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Irrigation In Peanuts
Georgia peanut farmers can’t control rainfall or the recent deluge the state received over the last week. They can, however, control how much water they apply to their crops through irrigation. A University of Georgia researcher believes applying too much water to peanuts can invite diseases and reduce yields.