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57 results found for Corn - Feed Crop
Target spot on cotton CAES News
Soggy fields
Rain may be a good thing, but too much of a good thing can become a problem for Georgia farmers.
CAES News
Breeding resilience
Corn, wheat, rice and other modern cereals have been bred over the past centuries to produce as much grain as possible. However, to feed a growing population, plant breeders may have to coax out the raw survival traits of older and locally adapted plant varieties.
John Bernard, a University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences professor of animal and dairy science on the Tifton campus, talks during the Corn Silage and Forage Field Day last week. CAES News
Increased rainfall
While the spring rains have helped increase forage and corn yields, farmers are worried the wet plants and ground could lead to more disease and insect problems.
Corn tassels stretch toward the sun in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Organic grain production
There are about 1 million acres of certified organic grain and oil seed fields in the United States, but not many in Georgia. The growing demand for organic grains and seed oils in the southeast could change that. With several new potential mills that can handle organic grain coming on line in Georgia, there are new opportunities to enter this growing market.
Calvin Perry, superintendent at the University of Georgia Stripling Irrigation Research Park, gives a presentation on variable-rate irrigation at the Climate Adaptation Exchange event held Feb. 8 in Tifton, Ga. CAES News
Building Resilience
Adapting to unpredictable weather is part of Lamar Black’s job as a farmer in Jenkins County, Ga. Black grows cotton, corn and peanuts on more than 400 acres, so each year he plans for and adjusts to extreme temperatures and rain, or lack thereof.
Participants view exhibits at the 2010 Southeast Bioenergy Conference at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center. CAES News
Alternative energy conference
From wood pellet and biodiesel production or mining landfills for methane to running county patrol cars and busses on everything from propane to peanut oil — Georgia has become a laboratory for testing new energy technologies.
Dr. Mike Lacy, department head, University of Georgia Department of Poultry Science CAES News
High corn costs
Severe drought in the Midwest corn-belt is driving up poultry feed costs in Georgia. Economists and poultry industry experts predict corn costs will increase 50 percent in 2012 compared to typical years. Some economists say corn prices could double by the end of the summer.
Steve Brown is the assistant dean for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Georgia's biofuel future
I still believe the biofuel era is coming to Georgia. Currently, the risks and uncertainties of anything new are holding things back, but once this train starts moving, it’s going to be a fast one.
Soil moisture conditions in the southern half of the state are generally at the fifth percentile, meaning the soils at the end of May would be wetter 95 out of 100 years. CAES News
Drought Impact
The widespread drought that’s made national headlines this week will probably be a boon for some Georgia corn producers, but a costly burden for the state’s poultry and beef industries.