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135 results found for Pesticide
Ambrosia beetle damage on a fig tree. CAES News
Fig Pest
Backyard fig gardeners may be seeing toothpick-like spines protruding from their beloved fig trees. This is a sign that ambrosia beetles are boring into the tree’s stems.
Termites feed on pieces of wood in garden soil. CAES News
Termite Behavior
Homeowners who tackle termites may think the tiny insects spend their days eating wood. But a University of Georgia entomologist says 80 percent of the time they do absolutely nothing.
Poison ivy grows up a tree in Jackson, Ga. CAES News
Destroy Weeds
Growing a vegetable garden consists of more than just keeping the plants healthy. It’s also about making sure the weeds don’t take over.
A carpenter bee prepares to build its nests in a tree. CAES News
Carpenter bee damage
Tired of watching carpenter bees slowly gnaw through the wood on her porch, Deborah Harris bought a trap as an alternative to spraying pesticides. The traps can be bought at craft shows or online or, if you’re handy, made at home.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Attracting Pollinators
A butterfly and container garden workshop will be offered Wednesday, May 28 from 9 a.m. until noon at the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden off Ellis Road in Griffin.
Unlike bagged manure, "free" manure from your local farm may come with weed seeds and pesticide residue. Check the source of your manure before bringing home extras. CAES News
Free Manure?
Using animal manure to amend garden and landscaping soil was common practice 20 years ago. Today, University of Georgia Extension agents, discourage it.
Squash vine borer larva inside squash vine. CAES News
Modified Organics
To place the certified organic seal on their produce, farmers must follow a strict list of rules. Home gardeners who want to use organic practices can take the first steps by using methods one University of Georgia expert calls “modified organics.”
In this file photo, an array of pesticides are lined on the shelves of a Griffin, Ga., feed and seed store. CAES News
Pesticide Applicator Classes
Certified pesticide applicators need recertification training and credits to keep their licenses up-to-date. To help provide this training, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has planned pesticide applicator recertification classes in Savannah, Griffin and Cartersville this February.
Thrips are tiny winged insects that feed chiefly on plants. Many species damage cultivated plants, by either sucking the sap or transmitting viral plant diseases. Thrips reach a maximum length of about half an inch. Most have two pairs of long, narrow, hair-fringed wings. CAES News
Thrips Damage
A tiny insect proved to be a formidable foe for Georgia farmers in 2013. Whether thrips will deliver a similar punch in 2014 remains to be seen. There are more than 7,000 species of thrips, but only two cause problems for Georgia farmers and UGA researchers — tobacco thrips and western flower thrips.