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University of Georgia researchers are studying the effectiveness of applying a Bacillus bacteria species to the stigmas of female flowers to slow the spread of bacterial fruit blotch from seed to seedling. CAES News
Battling Blotch
Georgia farmers struggle to control bacterial fruit blotch (BFB), but University of Georgia plant pathologists have discovered that naturally occurring bacteria can combat the disease.
Celosia is one of many flowering plants that attracts beneficial pollinating insects. Other flowering plants that attract beneficial insects include aster, butterfly weed, coneflower, cosmos, rudbeckia, sunflower and zinnias. CAES News
Bees, Bugs & Blooms
A workshop focused on attracting and protecting beneficial insects will be offered Wednesday, April 20, from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. in Fayetteville, Georgia, by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts.
Mulch added to the base of vegetable plants is an effective way to keep weeds at bay without using a pesticide. CAES News
Weed Control
Home gardeners often call their University of Georgia Extension office to ask which herbicides can safely be used in the garden. For all practical purposes, no herbicides can totally replace the trusty garden hoe and mulch.
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise. CAES News
Pollinator Decline
With reports of declining monarch butterfly populations and honeybee deaths, the plight of pollinators and other beneficial insects has been headlining the news for months now.
Sugarcane aphids at various stages of development. CAES News
Sugarcane Aphids
Sugarcane aphids have turned their back on their namesake and become a major pest for Georgia’s grain sorghum growers. The pest began infesting fields in the state two years ago and, last year, devastated farmers who chose not to apply spray controls, said University of Georgia small grains entomologist David Buntin.
In "Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast," Susan Varlamoff pulls together science-based information from Southern land-grant universities on various aspects of environmentally friendly gardening. CAES News
Sustainable Gardening Book
In her new book, “Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast,” Susan Varlamoff, CAES director of the Office of Environmental Sciences, aims to provide home gardeners with comprehensive information on environmentally friendly gardening and to teach readers how to create an ecosystem in home landscapes.
CAES News
Pest Facility
Since the pest control training center opened on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia, thousands of pest control operators from across the Southeast have received training. Now the training facility is expanding to allow pest control operators to learn how to control pests in commercial kitchens and schools and pests like bed bugs in bedroom settings.
The most common species of fruit fly has red/orange eyes, but not all fruit flies have red/orange eyes. Fruit flies, typically just an eighth of an inch in size, often hover around and just above food (most often decomposing vegetable matter) prior to landing.

Habits: Feed mainly on decaying vegetable matter, compost, rotting fruit, etc. Often found around salad bars and restaurants where vegetable matter and juices collect. Also called vinegar flies, since vinegar (acetic acid) is a decomposition product of some rotting vegetable matter.

Interventions: Find larval fly feeding site(s) and clean or otherwise throw away rotting fruit or vegetable matter. Remove garbage, including the plastic liner, and other refuse at least twice per week.

Might Be Confused With: humpbacked flies, fungus gnats, moth flies. CAES News
Fruit Flies
Fruit flies can be a problem year-round, but are especially common during late summer and fall because they are attracted to ripe or fermenting fruits and vegetables. The best way to avoid problems with fruit flies is to eliminate sources of attraction.
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Ant Control
Fall is the best time to control fire ants, so start next year’s battle plan now. Fire ant colonies have been growing all summer and will have reached their peak size by the end of September. It is best to attack these colonies before cooler weather sends them deep into the ground.