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John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org CAES News
Tree Sex
Female flowers and female trees produce fruit and seeds. Male flowers and trees produce pollen. Making the correct choice of tree gender can be important. Anyone who has ever smelled putrid ginkgo fruit, washed mulberries off their car or sneezed at tree pollen should understand.
Often planted to create borders or buffers, Leyland cypress trees can grow four feet taller in just a year. Planting too close together or too close to structures can present a huge problem as the tree matures. CAES News
Leland Cypress
Leyland cypress are one of the most commonly planted landscape trees, but poor site selection and disease pressure may soon send them the way of red tips and Bradford pears.
Entomosporium leaf spot on Photinia (Red Tip). Small reddish leaf spots appear initially. As spots age, center is grayish with a dark purple border. Leaf spots may coalesce causing severe leaf blight. Severely infected leaves drop prematurely. Over time severely infected plants die. Infection is favored by poor air circulation and prolonged periods of leaf wetness. CAES News
Leaf spot disease
Excessive rain signals another a bad year for leaf spot diseases on landscape trees and shrubs. The leaf spotting that affects pear trees, including both edible pears and ornamental Bradford types, is caused by a fungal disease known as Entomosporium leaf spot. This disease also affects related shrubs such as Indian hawthorn and red tip photinia.
When using pesticides, remember that the safe and legal use of pesticides requires that the entire label be followed exactly. Contact your local Extension agent if you're unsure about a product. CAES News
Stop, Read, Apply
As we head into summer, we start to see problems with weeds, diseases and insects in the landscape and around vegetable gardens. Some of these pest problems can be solved without the use of chemicals, but if the pest population reaches damaging levels, using pesticides may be warranted. Remember that using pesticides is safe and legal but requires reading and following label directions in their entirety.
A layer of natural mulch around plants will help protect soil moisture from evaporation and provide organic material for your soils. CAES News
Water Conservation in the Landscape
You might be reaching for the watering can here in Georgia, considering recent hot and dry conditions over most of the state. And with World Environment Day coming up on June 5, home gardeners are considering what they can do to sustainably irrigate their plants and sustain soil moisture. There are actions you can take now to help conserve water in your landscape and keep your plants hydrated.
Members of the UGA Horticulture Club prepare for the cub’s spring rose sale. Each year, club members sell bouquets for Valentine’s Day to fundraise for club operations, trips and scholarships. (Photo taken in 2019) CAES News
Horticulture Club Scholarship
Students in the University of Georgia’s Horticulture Club are growing more than plants. They’re also growing support for current and future Bulldogs.
UGA horticulture Professor Matt Chappell demonstrated proper pruning technique at a green industry event in January 2020. CAES News
Perfect Pruning
Pruning in the correct manner and at the proper time can help to maintain the size and shape of your woody shrubs, improving their appearance and appealing to the artist in every gardener.
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir. CAES News
Sustainable Gardening
Professional and home gardeners alike can grow landscapes sustainably with the help of biodegradable plant containers, but gardeners may wonder whether these containers decompose quickly enough to avoid hindering plant growth.
Bob Westerfield, UGA Extension consumer horticulturist, demonstrates a pruning technique during a class held on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Plant Pruning
To prune or not to prune, that is the question. Pruning is an important part of maintaining plant health and maximizing plant productivity. This is often a topic that brings fear and confusion, but pruning is, in fact, a beneficial and routine task.