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Student working at UGA's organic demonstration farm at the Durham Horticulture Farm, at 1221 Hog Mountain Road in Watkinsville. CAES News
Organic Twilight Tour
UGA organic and sustainable agriculture experts will host the second annual Organic Twilight Tour on July 11 at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences organic research farm in Watkinsville.
Corn tassels stretch toward the sun in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Garden rows
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, I answer hundreds of gardening question. This week, a gardener wanted to know how far apart to space her garden rows. The short answer is: it depends.
In this file photo, an array of pesticides are lined on the shelves of a Griffin, Ga., feed and seed store. CAES News
Pesticide credits
Certified pesticide applicators need recertification training and continuing education credits to maintain their licenses. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has planned pesticide applicator recertification classes for May in Albany and Gainesville.
Farmers and members of the general public met in Macon on March 20 to view a listening session in Atlanta on the proposed new food safety act. Lee Lancaster, senior compliance specialist with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, is shown explaining how to submit comments to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. CAES News
Food safety act
Concerned Georgia farmers gathered in Atlanta, Macon and Tifton on Wednesday, March 20 to hear a summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s new Food Safety Modernization Act. Proposed by Congress, the act was developed in an effort to improve the safety of the nation’s food supply.
Squash vine borer larva inside squash vine. CAES News
Tips and tricks to beating the squash vine borer
You can have tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers galore; but no backyard garden is complete without summer squash.
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia. CAES News
How to pick the perfect pumpkin
One of the surest signs that fall is upon us is the appearance of pumpkins for sale along roadsides. If the pumpkins are ready for harvest, frost can't be far behind.
Orange Bulldog is an improved pumpkin variety developed from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America with greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. Those original seeds yielded a long flat pumpkin, not one that lends itself to jack-o'-lanterns. So, George Boyhan, Gerald Krewer and retired UGA horticulturist Darbie Granberry made improved selections for adaptation to Georgia conditions. Orange Bulldog made its debut in 2004. Orange Bulldog consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pound per acre in north and South Georgia. Photo George Boyhan holding immature pumpkin taken October 2009. CAES News
Orange Bulldog
Heading to a local pumpkin patch to pick the season’s best is a time-honored fall family activity. Thanks to University of Georgia researchers, a better, Georgia-specific pumpkin is available for carving or baking.