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23 results found for Pumpkins
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.
Whether you are searching for pelleted seed, unique vegetables or hard-to-find flowers, seed catalogs are full of every kind of seed a gardener could imagine. CAES News
Garden Seed
Seed catalogs introduce gardeners to new or different plants that they may not be able to find as seedlings at local garden centers. The information in catalogs can be a bit overwhelming to novice gardeners, so it is important to know how to interpret some of the technical information and abbreviations, much like learning the language of gardeners.
Pictured are pumpkins growing on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2014. CAES News
Growing Pumpkins
High temperatures, humid nights and disease pressure make growing pumpkins difficult for south Georgia farmers, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
For the second year in row Caroline Daniel, of Terrell County 4-H, has won first place in Georgia 4-H's annual pumpkin contest with a 350-pound behemoth of an Atlantic Giant pumpkin. In 2014, Daniel also came in first with a 430-pound pumpkin. CAES News
Giant Pumpkins
It’s not quite a dynasty, but one Terrell County, Georgia, teenager has ruled the competitive pumpkin-growing circuit for youth in Georgia for the last two years.
University of Georgia Extension specialists say rinse fruits and vegetables well in running water that is safe for drinking before using them. Fruits and vegetables with firm skins or hard rinds can be washed by scrubbing with a clean vegetable brush under running water. CAES News
Safe Harvest
Keeping produce safe means keeping harmful bacteria, viruses and parasites from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Enjoy the rewards of growing food through planning and some practical food safety tips.
Pie pumpkin painted during workshop at UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Preserving Pumpkins
Pumpkins are a staple of fall-time cuisine and festivities. Whether canned, dried or pickled, there are some important tips to keep in mind when preserving this holiday favorite. Due to natural acidity levels, pumpkins require certain precautions be taken when canning in order to make preserves that are safe to eat.
‘Orange Bulldog’ is an improved pumpkin variety developed by UGA scientists from germplasm collected in the jungles of South America. It has greater levels of resistance to viruses than conventional pumpkins. ‘Orange Bulldog’ made its debut in 2004 and has consistently produced yields of 13,000 to 20,000 pounds per acre in north and south Georgia. CAES News
UGA Pumpkins
This time of year, University of Georgia horticulturist George Boyhan’s mind turns to pumpkin carving.