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99 results found for Ornamental Horticulture
Sweet Pickle Pepper has fruit that are about 2 inches long, resembling big and bold old-fashioned Christmas tree lights. CAES News
Ornamental Peppers
If you would like to give your garden a festive fall atmosphere, then give ornamental peppers a prominent place. They may not have noteworthy blooms, but varieties like 'Sweet Pickle' and 'Garda Tricolore' have fruit that will show out like Christmas tree lights.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. CAES News
Research Funding
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences broke records in fiscal year 2016 with $69 million in external funding to fuel college projects.
Jim Robbins, University of Arkansas, will present on using unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAVs or drones, in "Drones in Production – Inventory Management and Stress Detection" at UGA Extension's Academy of Plant Production, June 12-15 in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Academy of Crop Production
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Green Industry Association are inviting veteran nursery and greenhouse growers to “get nerdy” with them this summer at the inaugural Academy of Crop Production, June 12-15 at Hotel Indigo in Athens, Georgia.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
Edible Landscaping
The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edible plants can act as substitutes for annual plants, but there are some options that can substitute for shrubs, vines and small trees.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Prune After Bloom
Spring-flowering plants are beginning to pop with color. As soon as their color fades, landscapers can prepare to prune and groom these plants.
Katharine Rose Hall, a senior studying communication sciences and disorders in the UGA College of Education, juxtaposed the crown of a North Campus Ginkgo tree with one of the UGA Holmes-Hunter Academic Building's Corinthian columns in her first place photo. CAES News
UGA Campus Arboretum
The University of Georgia Campus Arboretum Initiative, sponsored by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Department of Horticulture, has announced the winners of its 2015 Memorable UGA Campus Trees and Shrubs Photo Competition.
Springlike weather throughout the state cause ornamental shrubs and trees to bloom early. These azaleas blossomed the week before Christmas in Hart County. CAES News
Pruning Patience
With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged some of these early signs of life. But there’s still hope for those way-too-early bloomers. The key is to be patient and wait to see what happens.
Christmas plants, like these Christmas cacti and Norfolk Island pine, can make the perfect gift for the green thumbs on your holiday list. CAES News
Living Christmas Trees
Container-grown or balled-and-burlapped Christmas trees can be planted as landscape trees after the holidays. This way of enjoying a Christmas tree is practical in Georgia, where the mild December or early January weather is ideal for tree planting. With care and planning, your Christmas tree will serve as a living memory for many years.
Wayne Hanna, CAES turf breeder and professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, has been inducted into the National Academy of Inventors. CAES News
National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors has named two University of Georgia faculty members to the 2015 class of NAI Fellows. Wayne Hanna, professor of crop and soil sciences in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and David Chu, Distinguished Research Professor in the College of Pharmacy, join an elite group of 582 innovators representing more than 190 prestigious research universities and governmental and nonprofit research institutions.