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Browse Ornamental Horticulture Stories - Page 4

97 results found for Ornamental Horticulture
This fall, the Society of American Florists (SAF) will honor UGA Professor of Horticulture Paul Thomas's dedication to his students and his contributions to horticultural science with the 2017 Alex Laurie Award, the industry group's most prestigious award. CAES News
Horticulture Award
For University of Georgia horticulture professor Paul Thomas, cultivating the next generation of horticulturists has always been as important as cultivating his next crop of plants.
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms. CAES News
'Cowboy' Perennial Peanut
The University of Georgia-bred ‘Cowboy’ perennial peanut plant doesn’t produce edible peanuts, but this new cultivar offers homeowners a colorful addition to ornamental beds and a supplemental source of nitrogen for surrounding grasses.
CAES News
Banana Shrubs
There have been weeks of tantalizing fragrance in the past few months that few children or families have experienced. This champion of aroma I am referring to is the banana shrub. The banana shrub is an heirloom from the 1700s. It produces blossoms for months of sweet, fresh bananas with a scent so intense, you’ll wish you could bottle it up so it could compete with the French perfumes, or put it in a shake and drink it. It is one of the more amazing scents in the plant world.
Dogwood Blooms CAES News
Dogwood Genetics
Dogwoods are one of the most popular landscape trees in the American South, but little is known about the genetics of these spring-blooming beauties. Researchers at the University of Georgia are hoping to recruit an army of citizen scientists this spring to help collect data that will help them better understand genetic variation among dogwood trees.
'Ice Follies' daffodils return faithfully each year to the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah, Georgia. CAES News
Early Risers
With the arrival of the narcissus, the first hint of spring is trumpeting, so to speak, in the South.
The golden-colored 'Caramel' and rust-colored 'Lava Lamp' are two hybrids of Heuchera villosa growing in the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah. CAES News
Coral Bells
Coral bells deserve a place in the sun, partial shade or shade. Plant them along woodland trails, in front of shrubs or partner them with wood fern or autumn fern or even hostas. Gardeners in the South must try them as a sunny, cool-season component plant.
Lamiums reach a height of 8 to 12 inches with a spread of 24 inches, making them a perfect spiller plant in mixed containers. CAES News
Deadnettle's Not Dead
January is typically a self-induced holding pattern when it comes to gardening. But if you find that you failed to get cool-season containers planted, then take advantage of fresh shipments of pansies, violas, petunias, dianthus and all the other component plants, like lamiums, as they arrive at your garden center.
Bright Lights Swiss chard is like a beet without a bottom. CAES News
Swiss Chard
There's a lot to love about Swiss chard. It is highly ornamental and wonderfully edible.
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape. CAES News
Fall-blooming Salvias
Salvias are deer-resistant perennials that create excitement in the garden by virtue of their spiky blooms. They also attract hummingbirds and pollinators.