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Members of the ExTEND Advanced Leadership Training Program graduated May 5 after two years of leadership workshops. CAES News
ExTEND Leadership Program
More than a dozen University of Georgia Cooperative Extension leaders graduated from UGA’s ExTEND Advance Leadership Training Program on May 5.
A group picture of the CAES students at the UGA Tifton Campus.

March 9, 2016 CAES News
Spring Break Tour
Spotlighting the state’s top industry, a statewide tour of Georgia’s agriculture has been the highlight of spring break for 36 students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.
Vidalia® Onion Committee Director Susan A. Waters is shown awarding Vidalia Onion Hall of Fame honors to Scott Angle. The former dean of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences was selected for the award based on his contributions to the industry by providing critical crop research and extension programs, Waters said. CAES News
Onion Hall of Fame
J. Scott Angle, former dean and director of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been inducted to the Vidalia® Onion Hall of Fame by The Vidalia® Onion Committee. Angle’s induction was announced during the committee’s annual awards banquet held on Feb. 6 at the Hawk's Point Golf Club in Vidalia, Georgia.
Whether you are searching for pelleted seed, unique vegetables or hard-to-find flowers, seed catalogs are full of every kind of seed a gardener could imagine. CAES News
Garden Seed
Seed catalogs introduce gardeners to new or different plants that they may not be able to find as seedlings at local garden centers. The information in catalogs can be a bit overwhelming to novice gardeners, so it is important to know how to interpret some of the technical information and abbreviations, much like learning the language of gardeners.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Vidalia Onion Crop
Heavy rainfall and high winds contributed to Georgia farmers growing fewer Vidalia onions this year, but demand for the popular vegetable and low yields for Texas onions helped keep prices steady.
Onion center rot is a devastating disease for Vidalia onion producers in south Georgia. CAES News
Onion Disease Detection
Onions, one of the biggest vegetable crops in Georgia, risk disease when they are harvested and stored. To solve this issue, University of Georgia researchers have developed new technologies, including a gas sensor and imaging methods, to detect diseases in onions.
Lettuce, a high-value cash crop, was among the highest yielding crops in a University of Georgia organic trial incorporating cover crops into a high-intensive crop rotation model at a UGA farm in Watkinsville, GA. The crop yielded a net return of over $9,000 per acre over the three-year study period. CAES News
Cover crops + organics
Organic vegetable farmers in the Southeast now have a successful model for planting summer cover crops with high-value, cool-season crops, thanks to a University of Georgia study. The two models use a series of crop rotations to increase yields, control insects and diseases, improve crop quality and build soil biomass.
Pictured is an onion plant infected with yellow bud disease. CAES News
Yellow Bud Disease
Georgia is the only state that produces sweet Vidalia onions. It’s also the only state where onion farmers are tackling a new disease — yellow bud.