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Browse Forages Stories - Page 4

58 results found for Forages
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Hay Contest
Hay doesn’t always get the respect it deserves. You won’t find it featured in any “farm-to-table” magazine spreads or highlighted in a “Got hay?” marketing campaign. Good hay’s not flashy, but without it, great steaks and cheese would be impossible.
Here is a picture of poor forage quality. CAES News
Forage Quality
High quality forage is essential to beef cattle’s nutrition and beef producers’ bottom lines, said University of Georgia Extension forage specialist Dennis Hancock. Focusing on forage quality helps farmers keep overall costs low, he said.
Beef cattle graze in a pasture at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Beef Cattle Update
Georgia cattle farmers, with both large- and small-scale operations, will learn useful, research-based information at the annual University of Georgia Mountain Beef Cattle Field Day Thursday, April 16 in Blairsville, Georgia.
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times. CAES News
Nitrogen Deficiency
In light of recent wet weather, nitrogen deficiency problems have shown up in some small grains and ryegrass fields.
Rows of forage sorghum regrowth after the first cutting. CAES News
Forage Sorghum

University of Georgia researchers are researching drought-tolerant, alternative forages for the state’s dairy producers to help safeguard their feed supply and save money.

Green acorns lie beneath a tree on the University of Georgia campus in Tifton, Ga. Many species of wildlife can eat acorns with no ill effects, but cows can contract acorn poisoning from eating too many - especially the green ones. CAES News
No green acorns
Squirrels, birds and small wildlife are known to dine on acorns. Cows, on the other hand, can eat a few acorns, but too many can cause deadly acorn—or “Quercus”—poisoning.
CAES News
Winter Cover Crop Study
Wayne County farmer Jonny Harris noticed long ago that feeding winter cover crops to his cattle improves their diet, his fields and his bottom line. He wanted to show other southeastern Georgia farmers they can reap the same benefits, but he knew he needed more evidence than decades of personal experience.
Here is a picture of poor forage quality. CAES News
Low Forage Quality
Last summer’s rain combined with this winter’s frigid temperatures have left cattle suffering and Georgia cattlemen seeking answers.
Cattle shortage around the country is a reason cattle prices are currently high. CAES News
High Cattle Prices
Georgia cattlemen are struggling to feed their herds and fighting the affects of poor quality forages. With calf prices at a high, selling off stock may be the best option, says one University of Georgia expert.