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Browse Field Crops, Forage and Turfgrass Production Stories

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Beware of burrweed in your lawn. CAES News
Beware of burrweed in your lawn.
Drought & Lawns
Last year’s prolonged drought has extended into this year. Lawns that were in poor health before the drought are having trouble greening up now. If you’re reviving a spotty lawn, perk it up with help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.  
Twenty-one CAES graduate students hit the road in May to explore crop protection career opportunities in Florida. CAES News
Twenty-one CAES graduate students hit the road in May to explore crop protection career opportunities in Florida.
Crop Protection Careers
The search for a perfect job can feel like a major quest. That quest turns literal for a group of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students for one week each summer.
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia. CAES News
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia.
Black Shank Disease
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia.
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms. CAES News
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms.
'Cowboy' Perennial Peanut
The University of Georgia-bred ‘Cowboy’ perennial peanut plant doesn’t produce edible peanuts, but this new cultivar offers homeowners a colorful addition to ornamental beds and a supplemental source of nitrogen for surrounding grasses.
David Bertioli, an International Peanut Genome Initiative plant geneticist of the Universidade de Brasília, has joined the faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bertioli first came to UGA in 2013 as a visiting professor. CAES News
David Bertioli, an International Peanut Genome Initiative plant geneticist of the Universidade de Brasília, has joined the faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bertioli first came to UGA in 2013 as a visiting professor.
GRA Distinguished Investigator
David Bertioli, a world-class expert in the genetics and genomics of peanut species, will join the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as a professor and the university’s first Georgia Research Alliance Distinguished Investigator.
Steers graze on sorghum-sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Steers graze on sorghum-sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages.
Field Day
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Corn Silage and Forage Field Day is set for Thursday, June 15, on the UGA campus in Tifton, Georgia.
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney does a demonstration on insect scouting. CAES News
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney does a demonstration on insect scouting.
Scouting Schools
The annual University of Georgia Insect Scouting Schools are open to farmers, consultants and those interested in learning how to diagnose insect damage on high-value agricultural crops like cotton, peanuts and soybeans.
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core. CAES News
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core.
Room to Grow
Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.
Cotton is watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. Irrigation equipment needs to be serviced before the production season begins. CAES News
Cotton is watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. Irrigation equipment needs to be serviced before the production season begins.
Cotton Irrigation
Decreasing irrigation for cotton crops during the early season may not affect yields and could save growers more than 54,000 gallons of water per acre, according to University of Georgia researchers.
Layby equipment being used in corn. CAES News
Layby equipment being used in corn.
Layby Herbicide Program
Layby herbicide programs allow Georgia field corn growers to better control weeds throughout the growing season, according to Brooke Jeffries, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Wheeler County, Georgia.