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533 results found for Field Crops, Forage and Turfgrass Production
Steers graze on sorghum-sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Steers graze on sorghum-sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages.
Field Day
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Corn Silage and Forage Field Day is set for Thursday, June 15, on the UGA campus in Tifton, Georgia.
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney does a demonstration on insect scouting. CAES News
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney does a demonstration on insect scouting.
Scouting Schools
The annual University of Georgia Insect Scouting Schools are open to farmers, consultants and those interested in learning how to diagnose insect damage on high-value agricultural crops like cotton, peanuts and soybeans.
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core. CAES News
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core.
Room to Grow
Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.
Cotton being watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Cotton being watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014.
Cotton Irrigation
Decreasing irrigation for cotton crops during the early season may not affect yields and could save growers more than 54,000 gallons of water per acre, according to University of Georgia researchers.
Layby equipment being used in corn. CAES News
Layby equipment being used in corn.
Layby Herbicide Program
Layby herbicide programs allow Georgia field corn growers to better control weeds throughout the growing season, according to Brooke Jeffries, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Wheeler County, Georgia.
Aggrey Gama, a Malawian food scientist working on his PhD at the University of Georgia, recently returned to Griffin, where he is working with advising professor Koushik Adhikari, to design a peanut-based beverage. CAES News
Aggrey Gama, a Malawian food scientist working on his PhD at the University of Georgia, recently returned to Griffin, where he is working with advising professor Koushik Adhikari, to design a peanut-based beverage.
Peanut drink research
Aggrey Gama, a doctoral student at the University of Georgia’s (UGA) Griffin campus, is crafting a drink that would deliver the nutrition and tastiness of peanuts to consumers in his home country of Malawi.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark.
Kudzu Bug Decline
Once a devastating presence in Georgia’s soybean fields and a major nuisance to homeowners, the kudzu bug population has diminished over the past three years.
University of Georgia scientist Peggy Ozias-Akins, a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences professor of horticulture on the UGA Tifton Campus, applies advanced biotechnology and molecular biology tools — tools she developed herself in some cases — to improve crops like peanuts. CAES News
University of Georgia scientist Peggy Ozias-Akins, a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences professor of horticulture on the UGA Tifton Campus, applies advanced biotechnology and molecular biology tools — tools she developed herself in some cases — to improve crops like peanuts.
Ozias-Akins Honored
University of Georgia Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins has been awarded the title of Distinguished Research Professor, an honor awarded to UGA faculty recognized internationally for their contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. She and her colleagues have created new and improved plant varieties that are higher yielding, more disease resistant, more nutritious or have greater ornamental value.
'TifTuf' is pictured growing in front of the Future Farmstead on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
'TifTuf' is pictured growing in front of the Future Farmstead on the UGA Tifton campus.
Southeastern Turfgrass Conference
The 71st annual Southeastern Turfgrass Conference will be held on Tuesday, May 16, at the Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
To avoid thrips damage on peanuts (pictured above), consider the several thrips management options available to peanut growers. CAES News
To avoid thrips damage on peanuts (pictured above), consider the several thrips management options available to peanut growers.
Monitor Thrips Activity
With thrips activity at a high level, peanut farmers are advised to closely monitor their peanut seedlings as planting season gets underway, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney.