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Spending a summer day in the Georgia wilderness is more fun when you're prepared for the heat, humidity and sun. CAES News
Outdoor Safety
Kyle Woosnam knows a thing or two about having fun outside and safely making it home by the end of the day.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Kudzu Bug
A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.
Both species of skunks found in Georgia are quite beautiful, but they are often viewed negatively due to the pungent, musky odor they can emit. This odor lingers for days and can become nauseating for some people. They also dig up lawns in search of insects and grubworms and raid backyard poultry pens and eat eggs and birds; eat garden vegetables; and damage beehives. CAES News
Skunk Control
It's the time of year when females skunks give birth. The two skunk species found in Georgia are striped skunks (polecats) and eastern spotted skunks (civet cats).
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter. CAES News
Peach Crop
Last year’s summer peach crop was disastrous, but Georgia’s peach crop rebounded this summer following colder temperatures in December and January, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent for Taylor and Peach counties.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Network Leader
University of Georgia agricultural climatologist Pam Knox has been named interim director of UGA’s network of 86 weather stations across Georgia.
4-H members enjoyed a trip to UGA's Stripling Irrigation Research Park for 4-H20 camp on Wednesday, June 6. CAES News
4-H20 Camp
4-H20 camp, sponsored by the University of Georgia, educates south Georgia 4-H’ers about the importance of water conservation in agriculture.
If you experience a prolonged power outage, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food at a safe, cold temperature for about four hours if the door remains closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours. A half-full freezer will only maintain its temperature for about 24 hours if the door stays closed. CAES News
Emergency Food Safety
All hands on deck! Stormy weather and hurricanes can blow through with little warning this time of year. Preparation before the storm hits can mean the difference between safe food and water and contaminated supplies that can make you sick.
Peanut plants under water in Plains, Georgia.
May 31, 2018 CAES News
Rainy Impact
Two consecutive weeks of rainfall in Georgia stunted the growth of the state’s peanut crop and created ideal conditions for diseases in vegetable fields, leaving farmers scrambling to decide what to do next.
Did you know that University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has a library of information on how to prepare for and recover from natural disasters and household emergencies? From packing an emergency preparedness kit to rehabbing a water logged landscape, Georgians can find the emergency information they need by visiting extension.uga.edu/topic-areas/timely-topics/emergencies.html . CAES News
Tropical Warnings
Longtime residents of Georgia may remember the devastating floods of Tropical Storm Alberto in July 1994. The rain was so intense that Georgia’s one-day rainfall record was set during that storm: 21.10 inches of rain was recorded in Americus, Georgia, over a 24-hour period ending on July 6, 1994, as the storm stalled over the state. Despite that incredible record and the resulting damage, the National Hurricane Center did not retire that storm’s name. “Alberto” is the first on the list of Atlantic tropical storm names for the 2018 season, which begins on June 1.