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Browse Urban Agriculture Stories - Page 18

160 results found for Urban Agriculture
Peeling lead paint on the exterior of the Wright House, a historic building at the Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. CAES News
Lead Safety
Lead can be poisonous, and many Americans live in homes contaminated by lead-based paint on their walls, windows and doors.
Butterfly Weed is a native herbaceous perennial that attracts butterflies like magnets with its florescent orange blooms. CAES News
Spring gardening
Welcome to the 35th annual Spring Garden Packet from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Written by CAES faculty, editors and graduate and undergraduate students, these articles are provided to help you with timely, valuable statewide gardening information.
CAES News
Volatile October
Northern Georgia continued to see wet conditions as the southeastern part of the state dried in October. Several record high and low temperatures were set with an active weather pattern that sent both warm and cold fronts moving across the state.
Horticulture graduate student Jongyun Kim checks on a plant's soil moisture sensor in UGA horticulture professor Marc van Iersel's greenhouse. CAES News
Save water, save money
Many ornamental nursery growers test to see if their plants need water by sticking a finger in the soil to see if it’s dry. Or, they just water them whether they need it or not. University of Georgia horticulturists have found a better way, one that requires less water, less fertilizer, less money and fewer dirty fingers.
Screen shot of Turfgrass Management iPhone application. Developed by Patrick McCullough July 2009. CAES News
Turfgrass Management
What is the coolest thing about the iPhone? Its applications. The phone can convert international currency, find a nearby five-star restaurant, help park your car and do much more. Thanks to some University of Georgia experts it now can help turfgrass managers diagnose and remedy turf problems.
CAES News
Cleaning rainwater
From motor oil to bird droppings, pollutants have to go somewhere when it rains. Usually it’s a quick trip to a nearby stream, river or lake. But it doesn’t have to be.
CAES News
Pine Pollen
With all the beauty of spring comes the nuisance of pollen. Pollen is the male part of a plant's life. It isn't good or bad. It's just there, in great volume, in the spring. Some people consider spring pollen season a bad time, especially if they are allergic to specific pollens.