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152 results found for Urban Agriculture
Soil moisture conditions in the southern half of the state are generally at the fifth percentile, meaning the soils at the end of May would be wetter 95 out of 100 years. CAES News
Stop erosion
It is estimated that 25 billion tons of soil are lost every year due to erosion. With it taking 500 years to replace just one inch of top soil, any thing that helps to prevent erosion will benefit future generations.
A hyper-efficient irrigation system developed by researchers from UGA and other universities was recently recognized with nomination for the Katerva Awards, which recognize collaboration and innovation. CAES News
Katerva Award Nomination
Agriculture uses about 70 percent of the world’s fresh water supply, but a growing population’s increasing demand for drinking water means farmers need to learn how to do more with less water.
Elizabeth Andress, professor of foods and nutrition in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has been named the 2012 recipient of the National Award for Excellence in Extension for her long-term success in combining research and education in food safety. CAES News
National Award for Excellence in Extension
Elizabeth Andress, professor of foods and nutrition in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has been named the 2012 recipient of the National Award for Excellence in Extension for her long-term success in combining research and education in food safety.
Moss and lichens grow on the base of a redbud tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Shrub and tree health
Sometimes what looks like s serious problem for a plant’s health is not. Other times a little leaf discoloration could be a sign of major problems.
Rows of cover crops being grown for research at UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences organic research and demonstration farm in Watkinsville. CAES News
Fall Cover Crops
Cover crops may be your secret weapon to a better harvest next spring. Any gardener who was disappointed in their corn, tomato or squash harvests this summer might want to start planning for next summer’s crop now by thinking about planting cover crops.
Fresh brown eggs from chickens raised by a Pike County, Ga., farmer. CAES News
Raising backyard chickens
If your family is one of the many considering raising a flock of backyard chickens, there are a few things you may want to consider before you bring the birds home to roost.
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Tomato leaf roll
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents, like myself, are getting several phone calls about the leaves on homegrown tomato plants curling and rolling inward. Curling or rolling of tomato leaves can be caused by various factors including environmental stresses, a virus or herbicide damage.
Container garden including several different plants CAES News
Hot weather stress
When the temperatures reach triple digits, we hear plenty on the news about how to take care of our pets and ourselves, but not much about our plants. Recent record temperatures can obliterate our lawns and ornamentals in just a few hours if these plants are already under stress for other reasons.
A crowd browses the Trial Gardens at UGA at an industry open house earlier this summer. The gardens are expected to be in full bloom for the public open house on July 9. CAES News
Trial gardens
Over the last three decades, the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia have introduced home gardeners and landscape designers to thousands of new plant varieties.